S&P 500   4,455.48 (+0.15%)
DOW   34,798.00 (+0.10%)
QQQ   373.33 (+0.09%)
AAPL   146.92 (+0.06%)
MSFT   299.35 (-0.07%)
FB   352.96 (+2.02%)
GOOGL   2,844.30 (+0.71%)
TSLA   774.39 (+2.75%)
AMZN   3,425.52 (+0.28%)
NVDA   220.81 (-1.78%)
BABA   145.08 (-4.04%)
NIO   35.38 (-1.75%)
CGC   13.91 (-4.46%)
GE   103.80 (+0.82%)
MU   74.05 (+0.01%)
AMD   105.80 (-0.33%)
T   27.13 (-0.22%)
F   13.78 (+0.51%)
ACB   5.95 (-3.25%)
DIS   176.00 (-0.14%)
PFE   43.94 (-0.57%)
BA   221.39 (+0.13%)
AMC   40.01 (+0.08%)
S&P 500   4,455.48 (+0.15%)
DOW   34,798.00 (+0.10%)
QQQ   373.33 (+0.09%)
AAPL   146.92 (+0.06%)
MSFT   299.35 (-0.07%)
FB   352.96 (+2.02%)
GOOGL   2,844.30 (+0.71%)
TSLA   774.39 (+2.75%)
AMZN   3,425.52 (+0.28%)
NVDA   220.81 (-1.78%)
BABA   145.08 (-4.04%)
NIO   35.38 (-1.75%)
CGC   13.91 (-4.46%)
GE   103.80 (+0.82%)
MU   74.05 (+0.01%)
AMD   105.80 (-0.33%)
T   27.13 (-0.22%)
F   13.78 (+0.51%)
ACB   5.95 (-3.25%)
DIS   176.00 (-0.14%)
PFE   43.94 (-0.57%)
BA   221.39 (+0.13%)
AMC   40.01 (+0.08%)
S&P 500   4,455.48 (+0.15%)
DOW   34,798.00 (+0.10%)
QQQ   373.33 (+0.09%)
AAPL   146.92 (+0.06%)
MSFT   299.35 (-0.07%)
FB   352.96 (+2.02%)
GOOGL   2,844.30 (+0.71%)
TSLA   774.39 (+2.75%)
AMZN   3,425.52 (+0.28%)
NVDA   220.81 (-1.78%)
BABA   145.08 (-4.04%)
NIO   35.38 (-1.75%)
CGC   13.91 (-4.46%)
GE   103.80 (+0.82%)
MU   74.05 (+0.01%)
AMD   105.80 (-0.33%)
T   27.13 (-0.22%)
F   13.78 (+0.51%)
ACB   5.95 (-3.25%)
DIS   176.00 (-0.14%)
PFE   43.94 (-0.57%)
BA   221.39 (+0.13%)
AMC   40.01 (+0.08%)
S&P 500   4,455.48 (+0.15%)
DOW   34,798.00 (+0.10%)
QQQ   373.33 (+0.09%)
AAPL   146.92 (+0.06%)
MSFT   299.35 (-0.07%)
FB   352.96 (+2.02%)
GOOGL   2,844.30 (+0.71%)
TSLA   774.39 (+2.75%)
AMZN   3,425.52 (+0.28%)
NVDA   220.81 (-1.78%)
BABA   145.08 (-4.04%)
NIO   35.38 (-1.75%)
CGC   13.91 (-4.46%)
GE   103.80 (+0.82%)
MU   74.05 (+0.01%)
AMD   105.80 (-0.33%)
T   27.13 (-0.22%)
F   13.78 (+0.51%)
ACB   5.95 (-3.25%)
DIS   176.00 (-0.14%)
PFE   43.94 (-0.57%)
BA   221.39 (+0.13%)
AMC   40.01 (+0.08%)

4 Reasons Why Entrepreneurship Instructors Should Reconsider Required Textbooks

Sunday, July 25, 2021 | Entrepreneur


It had always been a dream while studying entrepreneurship as an undergraduate to succeed in business and return to teach the next generation of students someday. For me that dream came true, and the end of this semester has provided time to reflect on my impact. Innovation and entrepreneurship are exciting areas for exploration from everyone, from incoming undergraduates to tenured faculty.

No matter the discipline, everyone in academia should be excited to advance entrepreneurship to support startups in their community and across the United States. But while I enjoy reading books on innovation and entrepreneurship, the thought of having my students purchase textbooks to learn to be more entrepreneurial is not an approach that ever worked for me, and my classes require no textbooks.

Textbooks for innovation or entrepreneurship cannot give a formula for success

Steve Blank, author of The Four Steps to the Epiphany, founder of the Lean LaunchPad, and designer of National Science Foundation I-Corps (NSF I-Corps) and Hacking for Defense classes, is famous for telling students to "Get Out of the Building!"

This philosophy resonates with me as a student and instructor because it drives me to discover what separates successful entrepreneurs from everyone else. When I was an undergraduate student at the University of Hawaii, funds were tight and textbooks were much less of a priority than ensuring my pantry had at least a pack of ramen and a can of spam for my next meal. It is amazing how being a hungry entrepreneur, both literally and metaphorically, is a great motivator to attend classes and maximize office hours with an instructor.

Related: Why Entrepreneurship Is the Engine of Economic Development

The answers entrepreneurs seek are not found in textbooks

The mindset shift from looking for answers in a book to asking questions of others allows a natural mentorship to form between a professor and a student eager to start a business. This type of guidance helped set the stage for both my success as a student and an entrepreneur. The lessons I learned during office hours were much more valuable than anything I learned from a textbook. These interactions with my previous professors helped me become a better instructor. Talking to anyone can be difficult at first, but building a relationship showed that my instructors had compassion for my financial situation and enjoyed seeing me in class every day. As an instructor, it is energizing to see students eager to learn and apply those lessons to the student-led ventures they are building, every minute they are not in the classroom.

Being open to feedback in entrepreneurial endeavors sets the stage for success

As entrepreneurs, we all feel that we should know everything about our ventures and what it will take to succeed, but that is rarely the case. We are always learning by testing a hypothesis and striving to discover what we do not know. Innovation and entrepreneurship start by determining the current state, the status quo and building upon a foundation of discovery made by others. Suppose we want to advance any innovative endeavor. In that case, we need to be willing to accept that our assumptions are likely wrong and speak to everyone we can to test a hypothesis, then validate or invalidate what we thought as we pivot towards something that people are willing to buy.

Related: 4 Myths About Entrepreneurship You Need to Stop Believing

Textbooks do not contribute to building a community

Instead of textbooks, teachers should try experiential learning opportunities. For example, there is a learning opportunity called customer discovery, which empowers teams to distill a dozen interviews and present their findings to the entire class every week. If teams cannot complete interviews, then it is impossible to validate a hypothesis. Everyone is accountable for making customer discovery a priority and required to present what they learned.

It is wonderful to see more entrepreneurial educators skip the textbooks and engage students to build a community. The ultimate experiential learning opportunity starts with talking with customers, so it is time for entrepreneurial educators to end the required reading on launching a new venture.

Related: 5 Steps to Bringing Your Entrepreneurship Idea to Life


7 Fintech Stocks That Will Continue To Disrupt Traditional Banking

In April 2021, JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon described fintech companies as one of the “enormous competitive threats” to traditional banking. And with good reason. Fintech (short for financial technology) is not just “digital banking.” It’s a different approach to banking that traditional banks will not be able to replicate by outspending their competitors.

You see, cryptocurrency is getting a lot of attention for the way it’s disrupting the monetary system. But before there was bitcoin (CCC: BTC-USD), there was fintech.

What started out as a way to send money from one person to another without the need for a bank (i.e. peer-to-peer lending) has morphed into much more. Today, individuals and businesses can get loans, invest, and pay bills conveniently and securely. And they can do so without ever having to set foot into a bank.

Financial technology is democratizing finance for many individuals who have been left behind by the traditional banking system. The “unbanked” is a huge target audience. But whereas fintech started as reaching those that were unbanked out of necessity; it is cultivating a new audience among those who are going unbanked by choice.

In this special presentation, we’ll look at seven fintech companies that are leading in this space today and will do so well into the future.

View the "7 Fintech Stocks That Will Continue To Disrupt Traditional Banking".


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