S&P 500   4,280.15
DOW   33,761.05
QQQ   330.39
2 Important Retail Stock Battles to Watch
Average 126% gains – NO losers!?   (Ad)pixel
Pipeline break spills 45,000 gallons of diesel in Wyoming
Sinema took Wall Street money while killing tax on investors
MarketBeat: Week in Review 8/8 - 8/12
How Much Longer Will It Be Under $1? (Ad)pixel
Expanded IRS free-file system one step closer in Dems' bill
In Biden's big bill: Climate, health care, deficit reduction
Climate bill: Could coal communities shift to nuclear?
How Much Longer Will It Be Under $1? (Ad)pixel
S&P 500   4,280.15
DOW   33,761.05
QQQ   330.39
2 Important Retail Stock Battles to Watch
Average 126% gains – NO losers!?   (Ad)pixel
Pipeline break spills 45,000 gallons of diesel in Wyoming
Sinema took Wall Street money while killing tax on investors
MarketBeat: Week in Review 8/8 - 8/12
How Much Longer Will It Be Under $1? (Ad)pixel
Expanded IRS free-file system one step closer in Dems' bill
In Biden's big bill: Climate, health care, deficit reduction
Climate bill: Could coal communities shift to nuclear?
How Much Longer Will It Be Under $1? (Ad)pixel
S&P 500   4,280.15
DOW   33,761.05
QQQ   330.39
2 Important Retail Stock Battles to Watch
Average 126% gains – NO losers!?   (Ad)pixel
Pipeline break spills 45,000 gallons of diesel in Wyoming
Sinema took Wall Street money while killing tax on investors
MarketBeat: Week in Review 8/8 - 8/12
How Much Longer Will It Be Under $1? (Ad)pixel
Expanded IRS free-file system one step closer in Dems' bill
In Biden's big bill: Climate, health care, deficit reduction
Climate bill: Could coal communities shift to nuclear?
How Much Longer Will It Be Under $1? (Ad)pixel
S&P 500   4,280.15
DOW   33,761.05
QQQ   330.39
2 Important Retail Stock Battles to Watch
Average 126% gains – NO losers!?   (Ad)pixel
Pipeline break spills 45,000 gallons of diesel in Wyoming
Sinema took Wall Street money while killing tax on investors
MarketBeat: Week in Review 8/8 - 8/12
How Much Longer Will It Be Under $1? (Ad)pixel
Expanded IRS free-file system one step closer in Dems' bill
In Biden's big bill: Climate, health care, deficit reduction
Climate bill: Could coal communities shift to nuclear?
How Much Longer Will It Be Under $1? (Ad)pixel

Diplomacy, prayers: Things to know about the Ukraine crisis


Ukrainian servicemen greet each other as they patrol a street in Verkhnotoretske village in Yasynuvata district, Donetsk region, eastern Ukraine, Jan. 22, 2022. Ukrainians in the country's east are likely to be on the front lines of war if it comes, but they are far from the people making decisions about their fate. (AP Photo/Andriy Andriyenko, File)

WARSAW, Poland (AP) — Russia has placed more than 100,000 troops near Ukraine's border and ratcheted up war games in the region.

Moscow denies it is planning an assault, but the United States and its NATO allies fear that Russia is planning for war — and are making preparations of their own.

Here are things to know Wednesday about the international tensions over Ukraine, a crisis reminiscent of the Cold War.

___

RUSSIA'S WARNING

Russia increased its pressure on the West, warning that it would quickly take “retaliatory measures” if the U.S. and its allies reject its security demands and continue their “aggressive” policies.

Russia has demanded guarantees that NATO never admit Ukraine and other ex-Soviet nations as members and that the alliance roll back troop deployments in other former Soviet bloc countries, a region Moscow still views as its sphere of interest.

Some of the demands, like the membership pledge, are nonstarters for NATO, creating a seemingly intractable stalemate that many fear can only end in a war.

Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said he and other top officials will advise President Vladimir Putin on the next steps after receiving written replies from the United States to the demands. Those answers are expected this week — even though the U.S. and its allies have already made clear they will reject the top Russian demands.

___

UKRAINE DOWNPLAYS THE RISKS

Ukrainian officials have sought to calm nerves as tensions escalate.

Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba said Wednesday that while the concentration of Russian troops near Ukraine poses a threat, “their number is now insufficient for a large-scale offensive.”

“They are still missing some key military elements and systems to mount a big, full-scale offensive,” Kuleba told reporters.


He also noted that causing alarm could be an end in itself. Russia, he said, hopes to destabilize Ukraine by “spreading panic, raising pressure on Ukraine’s financial system and launching cyberattacks.”

___

HOPING FOR PEACE ON UKRAINE'S FRONT LINE

Soldiers and civilians in eastern Ukraine are waiting with helpless anticipation to see if war comes.

They understand that their fate is being decided by politicians in distant capitals. Even politicians in their own capital, Kyiv, have found themselves on the sidelines of several rounds of high-stakes diplomacy that so far have not yielded a breakthrough.

The battle-weary region has been fighting pro-Russia separatist fighters since 2014. It is an area close to where Russia has massed tens of thousands of soldiers in a troop buildup that U.S. President Joe Biden says could mount the largest invasion since World War II.

___

MORE DIPLOMACY

Presidential advisers from Russia, Ukraine, Germany and France are holding diplomatic negotiations in Paris amid the growing worries that Russia could invade Ukraine.

The talks are taking place in the so-called “Normandy format," which helped to ease hostilities in 2015, a year after Putin ordered the annexation of Ukraine’s Crimean Peninsula and the Russia-backed insurgency began in eastern Ukraine.

Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said that Moscow expects a “good frank” talk at the Paris meeting.

Several rounds of high-stakes diplomacy have failed to yield any breakthroughs, and tensions escalated further this week.

___

BRITAIN CALLS FOR MORE HELP FOR UKRAINE

British Foreign Secretary Liz Truss has urged European nations to do more to support Ukraine, saying “we would like to see our allies do more to help supply defensive support to Ukraine.”

The U.K. has sent anti-tank weapons to Ukraine in response to Russia massing troops near its border. It has ruled out sending combat troops, but Truss said Britain has “ruled nothing out in terms of sanctions.”

“In fact we’ll be legislating to toughen up our sanctions regime and make sure we are fully able to hit both individuals and companies and banks in Russia in the event of an incursion,” she told the BBC.

“What’s important is that all of our allies do the same, because it’s by collective action, by showing Vladimir Putin we’re united, that we will help deter a Russian incursion.”

___

GERMAN HELMETS

Among the NATO allies, Germany in particular has faced calls to help Ukraine more and been faulted for a perception that it prioritizing its economic ties with Russia over Ukraine's security.

Amid that backdrop, German Defense Minister Christine Lambrecht said that Germany will deliver 5,000 military helmets to Ukraine following a request from the country’s embassy.

She said that it was “a very clear signal that we stand by your side.” Defense Ministry spokesman Arne Collatz said he couldn’t give a timeline for the delivery.

Germany has said that it won’t deliver lethal weapons to Ukraine. Collatz said an Estonian request for authorization to supply old German howitzers to Kyiv is still being examined.

___

A DAYLONG PRAYER AT THE VATICAN

Pope Francis prayed that political leaders put aside personal interests and let dialogue prevail amid concerns of a Russian invasion of Ukraine.

Francis kicked off a daylong prayer for peace in Ukraine on Wednesday with a special appeal at the end of his weekly general audience. “Please, never again war,” Francis said.

“May our prayer and invocations to the heavens touch the hearts and minds of those responsible on Earth, that they make dialogue prevail and that the good of all be put before interests of one side,” he said. “Let us insistently ask the Lord that in this land may fraternity overcome wounds, fears and divisions.”

Noting that Thursday marks Holocaust Remembrance Day, Francis said Ukrainians had suffered tremendous cruelties during World War II.

“They deserve peace,” he said.

7 Dividend Stocks That Earn 10% Every Month

Investors who are in or nearing their retirement years know the need for reliable income moves to the top of the priority list. That makes investing in dividend stocks a logical choice. Most dividend stocks pay dividends on a quarterly basis. However, for individuals who lack an income stream from a job, quarterly dividends of any size create an uneven income stream. That can be difficult in times of economic volatility, and particularly when facing rising inflation.

One solution for these investors is to purchase a special class of dividend stocks that pay dividends monthly. Monthly dividend income is a way to create predictable cash flow. And investors also get access to stocks that have a high dividend yield, sometimes in excess of 10%. That's nearly 10x the 1.6% average dividend yield of stocks in the S&P 500. And because of these company's business models, these yields are sustainable.  

In this special presentation, we'll look at 7 monthly dividend stocks that have a yield of over 10% as of June 2022.

View the "7 Dividend Stocks That Earn 10% Every Month".

Free Email Newsletter

Complete the form below to receive the latest headlines and analysts' recommendations for your stocks with our free daily email newsletter:

Most Read This Week

Recent Articles

Search Headlines:

Latest PodcastInvesting in What You Know Has Changed

What investors can learn from studying the past, as well as offering some ideas about asset classes with future potential.

MarketBeat Resources

Premium Research Tools

MarketBeat All Access subscribers can access stock screeners, the Idea Engine, data export tools, research reports, and other premium tools.

Discover All Access

Market Data and Calendars

Looking for new stock ideas? Want to see which stocks are moving? View our full suite of financial calendars and market data tables, all for free.

View Market Data

Investing Education and Resources

Receive a free world-class investing education from MarketBeat. Learn about financial terms, types of investments, trading strategies and more.

Financial Terms
Details Here
MarketBeat - Stock Market News and Research Tools logo

MarketBeat empowers individual investors to make better trading decisions by providing real-time financial data and objective market analysis. Whether you’re looking for analyst ratings, corporate buybacks, dividends, earnings, economic reports, financials, insider trades, IPOs, SEC filings or stock splits, MarketBeat has the objective information you need to analyze any stock. Learn more about MarketBeat.

MarketBeat is accredited by the Better Business Bureau MarketBeat is rated as Great on TrustPilot

© American Consumer News, LLC dba MarketBeat® 2010-2022. All rights reserved.
326 E 8th St #105, Sioux Falls, SD 57103 | contact@marketbeat.com | (844) 978-6257
MarketBeat does not provide personalized financial advice and does not issue recommendations or offers to buy stock or sell any security.

Our Accessibility Statement | Terms of Service | Privacy Policy | Do Not Sell My Information | RSS Feeds

© 2022 Market data provided is at least 10-minutes delayed and hosted by Barchart Solutions. Information is provided 'as-is' and solely for informational purposes, not for trading purposes or advice, and is delayed. To see all exchange delays and terms of use please see Barchart's disclaimer.