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S&P 500   3,822.69 (+0.03%)
DOW   31,051.76 (+0.34%)
QQQ   284.27 (+0.26%)
AAPL   140.16 (+1.98%)
MSFT   261.53 (+1.97%)
META   163.77 (+1.92%)
GOOGL   2,242.01 (+0.08%)
AMZN   109.48 (+1.94%)
TSLA   674.88 (-3.31%)
NVDA   155.42 (-2.75%)
NIO   21.61 (-3.35%)
BABA   115.74 (-0.87%)
AMD   77.48 (-4.09%)
MU   56.15 (-2.96%)
CGC   3.53 (-2.22%)
T   20.73 (+0.58%)
GE   64.06 (-2.76%)
F   11.53 (-2.37%)
DIS   95.02 (-0.94%)
AMC   13.29 (-0.67%)
PFE   51.18 (+1.03%)
PYPL   71.49 (-0.46%)
NFLX   176.61 (-1.66%)
S&P 500   3,822.69 (+0.03%)
DOW   31,051.76 (+0.34%)
QQQ   284.27 (+0.26%)
AAPL   140.16 (+1.98%)
MSFT   261.53 (+1.97%)
META   163.77 (+1.92%)
GOOGL   2,242.01 (+0.08%)
AMZN   109.48 (+1.94%)
TSLA   674.88 (-3.31%)
NVDA   155.42 (-2.75%)
NIO   21.61 (-3.35%)
BABA   115.74 (-0.87%)
AMD   77.48 (-4.09%)
MU   56.15 (-2.96%)
CGC   3.53 (-2.22%)
T   20.73 (+0.58%)
GE   64.06 (-2.76%)
F   11.53 (-2.37%)
DIS   95.02 (-0.94%)
AMC   13.29 (-0.67%)
PFE   51.18 (+1.03%)
PYPL   71.49 (-0.46%)
NFLX   176.61 (-1.66%)
S&P 500   3,822.69 (+0.03%)
DOW   31,051.76 (+0.34%)
QQQ   284.27 (+0.26%)
AAPL   140.16 (+1.98%)
MSFT   261.53 (+1.97%)
META   163.77 (+1.92%)
GOOGL   2,242.01 (+0.08%)
AMZN   109.48 (+1.94%)
TSLA   674.88 (-3.31%)
NVDA   155.42 (-2.75%)
NIO   21.61 (-3.35%)
BABA   115.74 (-0.87%)
AMD   77.48 (-4.09%)
MU   56.15 (-2.96%)
CGC   3.53 (-2.22%)
T   20.73 (+0.58%)
GE   64.06 (-2.76%)
F   11.53 (-2.37%)
DIS   95.02 (-0.94%)
AMC   13.29 (-0.67%)
PFE   51.18 (+1.03%)
PYPL   71.49 (-0.46%)
NFLX   176.61 (-1.66%)

EXPLAINER: What are the key climate themes at Davos?

Sunday, May 22, 2022 | Peter Prengaman, Associated Press


A view of Davos and its congress center prior to the annual meeting of the World Economic Forum, Switzerland, Sunday, May 22, 2022. (Gian Ehrenzeller/Keystone via AP)

DAVOS, Switzerland (AP) — While the COVID-19 pandemic and Russia's war in Ukraine will be focuses of the World Economic Forum’s gathering of business and government leaders, so too will climate change. It's captured the world’s attention in unignorable and devastating ways.

The acceleration of rising temperatures, the ferocity and costliness of major weather events, and the impact, particularly on people in developing countries, have pushed the issue from one of science to something that touches every aspect of life, including (or, perhaps especially) business and economics.

Of the roughly 270 panels Monday through Thursday, one-third are about climate change or its direct effects. U.S. climate envoy John Kerry, Ugandan climate activist Vanessa Nakate and Alok Sharma, president of last year's international climate conference COP26, are among the climate leaders expected in the Swiss resort town of Davos.

At the forum’s first in-person gathering in two years, the climate panels are as varied as the issue. They range from combating “eco-anxiety" to helping debt-ridden countries finance a renewable transition. Here's a look at some broader themes that are likely to emerge:

ENVIRONMENTAL, SOCIAL, GOVERNANCE

Several panels will wrestle with an approach to investing that considers the environment and other key factors. Known by the acronym ESG, it's become a force, with trillions of dollars invested in companies that meet certain criteria.

When it comes to climate change, ESG can be important. For individual investors all the way up to firms and government agencies that analyze how companies operate, disclosures and public declarations are paramount. They can be the basis of evaluating a company’s emissions, environmental impact and financial risks tied to climate change.

They are also controversial and raise questions: Should certain declarations be mandatory? Should they be standardized and regulated, and by whom? Or has the ESG movement already gone too far, ultimately hindering investment and doing little to rein in greenhouse gas emissions?


Viewpoints sometimes fall along political lines. In the U.S., many Republicans call them “woke,” while many on the left, particularly environmentalists and campaigners, argue that ramping up reporting and transparency could lead to real change.

Many managers of some of the world’s largest mutual funds have argued ESG is essential to evaluate risk. Just last week, Tesla CEO Elon Musk said the approach had “been weaponized by phony social justice warriors.”

ENERGY TRANSITION AND ‘NET ZERO'

The world’s top climate scientists have warned that significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions this decade is necessary to minimize warming and avoid the most devastating effects to the planet. That will require major changes in how business is done, from the way products are produced to how they are transported.

Several panels will look at areas where businesses have successfully transitioned much of their energy portfolio to renewables, the role of finance and government to incentivize or mandate changes, and strategies to keep businesses accountable. Despite heightened consciousness and pledges by businesses, emissions are going up worldwide.

“Moving climate debate from ambition to delivery” is a title of one panel that sums up the enormous challenge.

Sessions will look at sectors, like decarbonizing shipping and aviation, renewable transition plans and the challenges of achieving them in countries like China and India. There will be discussion of strategies to ensure major shifts are inclusive and consider people in historically marginalized countries, which are feeling some of the most intense effects of climate change.

An important current through all the discussions will be identifying what “net zero” is — and isn’t — when looking at pledges from companies and countries. Moving away from fossil fuels like coal and oil to renewables like solar and wind can reduce emissions and get a company closer to goals of taking an equal amount of emissions out of the atmosphere as it puts in.

But a transition to renewables often makes up only a small part of company plans. Many rely on balancing their carbon footprint by investing in forest restoration or other projects. While better than nothing, experts note that depending on carbon offsets doesn’t represent a shift in business practices.

WAR IN UKRAINE AND THE FUTURE OF ENERGY

Russia's war in Ukraine will loom large at the conference. When it comes to climate change, the conflict raises two central questions: How should countries respond to energy shocks from reducing or being cut off from Russian oil and gas? And will the war hasten the transition to renewable energies or help fossil fuel companies maintain the status quo?

Since the war began, there has been no shortage of businesses, environmentalists and political leaders trying to influence the answers to those questions, which will carry over to Davos.

“Energy Security and the European Green Deal” is one panel where participants are expected to argue that the way forward is away from fossil fuels. But European countries, some of which are heavily reliant on Russia for energy, also are scrambling to find other sources of natural gas and oil to meet short-term needs.

While no sessions explicitly make the case for a doubling down on reliance on fossil fuels or expanding extraction or exploration, if the last few months are any guide, those points of view will certainly be present.

___

Peter Prengaman is the Associated Press' global climate and environmental news director. Follow him here: http://twitter.com/peterprengaman

___

Associated Press climate and environmental coverage receives support from several private foundations. See more about AP’s climate initiative here. The AP is solely responsible for all content.


7 Agricultural Technology Stocks to Buy as Commodity Prices Remain Volatile

Agriculture stocks have a place in every investor's portfolio. The fact is that the byproduct of agriculture literally feeds the world. But for a variety of reasons, supply and/or demand can be disrupted. For example, the weather is often a concern. Farmers are always subject to periods of drought or flooding.

 But the past few years have shown how this sector is not immune from geopolitical concerns. The Covid-19 pandemic affected supply chains on top of seeing demand destruction in key markets. And this year, the world is seeing how interconnected we've become. Russia's war on Ukraine is shutting in a large percentage of the world's wheat supply.

However, with commodity prices soaring in several categories, investors have an opportunity in agriculture technology stocks. These companies run the gamut from companies that provide equipment to those that provide fertilizer, pesticides, and other products and services.

To help investors determine if this opportunity is right for them, we've created this special presentation. We assess the long-term opportunity for seven agricultural technology stocks.



View the "7 Agricultural Technology Stocks to Buy as Commodity Prices Remain Volatile".

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