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QQQ   315.04 (-2.80%)
AAPL   122.41 (-2.35%)
MSFT   230.21 (-1.85%)
FB   257.11 (-2.72%)
GOOGL   2,028.23 (-2.67%)
AMZN   3,087.15 (-2.29%)
TSLA   700.16 (-5.64%)
NVDA   533.88 (-7.95%)
BABA   243.05 (-2.91%)
CGC   33.81 (-5.03%)
GE   12.87 (-1.91%)
MU   89.90 (-2.83%)
NIO   48.05 (-7.35%)
AMD   82.96 (-4.58%)
T   28.65 (-2.48%)
F   11.90 (-3.02%)
ACB   11.08 (-4.81%)
DIS   192.87 (-2.35%)
BA   219.95 (-4.09%)
NFLX   537.43 (-2.89%)
BAC   36.14 (-0.66%)
S&P 500   3,844.57 (-2.06%)
DOW   31,506.73 (-1.42%)
QQQ   315.04 (-2.80%)
AAPL   122.41 (-2.35%)
MSFT   230.21 (-1.85%)
FB   257.11 (-2.72%)
GOOGL   2,028.23 (-2.67%)
AMZN   3,087.15 (-2.29%)
TSLA   700.16 (-5.64%)
NVDA   533.88 (-7.95%)
BABA   243.05 (-2.91%)
CGC   33.81 (-5.03%)
GE   12.87 (-1.91%)
MU   89.90 (-2.83%)
NIO   48.05 (-7.35%)
AMD   82.96 (-4.58%)
T   28.65 (-2.48%)
F   11.90 (-3.02%)
ACB   11.08 (-4.81%)
DIS   192.87 (-2.35%)
BA   219.95 (-4.09%)
NFLX   537.43 (-2.89%)
BAC   36.14 (-0.66%)
S&P 500   3,844.57 (-2.06%)
DOW   31,506.73 (-1.42%)
QQQ   315.04 (-2.80%)
AAPL   122.41 (-2.35%)
MSFT   230.21 (-1.85%)
FB   257.11 (-2.72%)
GOOGL   2,028.23 (-2.67%)
AMZN   3,087.15 (-2.29%)
TSLA   700.16 (-5.64%)
NVDA   533.88 (-7.95%)
BABA   243.05 (-2.91%)
CGC   33.81 (-5.03%)
GE   12.87 (-1.91%)
MU   89.90 (-2.83%)
NIO   48.05 (-7.35%)
AMD   82.96 (-4.58%)
T   28.65 (-2.48%)
F   11.90 (-3.02%)
ACB   11.08 (-4.81%)
DIS   192.87 (-2.35%)
BA   219.95 (-4.09%)
NFLX   537.43 (-2.89%)
BAC   36.14 (-0.66%)
S&P 500   3,844.57 (-2.06%)
DOW   31,506.73 (-1.42%)
QQQ   315.04 (-2.80%)
AAPL   122.41 (-2.35%)
MSFT   230.21 (-1.85%)
FB   257.11 (-2.72%)
GOOGL   2,028.23 (-2.67%)
AMZN   3,087.15 (-2.29%)
TSLA   700.16 (-5.64%)
NVDA   533.88 (-7.95%)
BABA   243.05 (-2.91%)
CGC   33.81 (-5.03%)
GE   12.87 (-1.91%)
MU   89.90 (-2.83%)
NIO   48.05 (-7.35%)
AMD   82.96 (-4.58%)
T   28.65 (-2.48%)
F   11.90 (-3.02%)
ACB   11.08 (-4.81%)
DIS   192.87 (-2.35%)
BA   219.95 (-4.09%)
NFLX   537.43 (-2.89%)
BAC   36.14 (-0.66%)
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Learn how to open a WhatsApp chat with yourself and enjoy the many advantages

Wednesday, January 20, 2021 | Entrepreneur


Opening a WhatsApp chat with yourself can be quite useful to have important files or messages on hand. Thus, you will access cooking recipes, to-do lists or the supermarket list in a practical and fast way.

Therefore, here we give you two options so that you can send yourself messages, photos, voice clips, among other files and thus, stop using the chats of people who have blocked you.

The first way is the most common and known. It consists of creating a group, however, for this you must add one or more contacts and then expel them, so it may not be so convenient. So the second way may be the most suitable.

How to create a chat with yourself step by step?

  1. Open your phone's browser (it can be Google Chrome)
  2. In the address bar type wa.me// and add your country code and then the ten digits of your phone number. For example, for Mexico the code is 52, so it would be wa.me//5255XXXXXXXX
  3. Then a window will appear with an invitation to chat with the corresponding number and a button that says "Continue to chat." Then press that option
  4. Later, a new chat with yourself will open in the WhatsApp application and you can start sending yourself messages or different multimedia files

Anchor chat for greater accessibility

If you want access to the chat with yourself to be even more direct, you should know that WhatsApp allows you to keep up to three conversations at the top of the message list. To do so, you just have to press and hold the chat you want to pin and choose the first icon that appears at the top (from left to right). To reverse this action you just have to press again and deselect the mentioned icon.

Related:
Learn how to open a WhatsApp chat with yourself and enjoy the many advantages
Aprende a abrir un chat en WhatsApp contigo mismo y disfruta de las múltiples ventajas
Hike Shuts Down Amid WhatsApp Privacy Row; Company To Focus On New Products


7 Stocks to Watch When Student Debt Forgiveness Gets Passed

Now that the Biden administration is fully in charge, student debt forgiveness has moved to the front burner. Consider these numbers. There is an estimated $1.7 trillion in student debt. The average student carries approximately $30,000 in student loans.

If $10,000 of student debt were to be canceled, there are estimates that one-third of borrowers (between 15 million to 16.3 million) would become debt-free. Of course, if the number hits $50,000 as some lawmakers are suggesting the impact would even greater.

Putting aside personal thoughts on the wisdom of pursuing this path, it has the potential to unleash a substantial stimulus into the economy.

And as an investor, it’s fair to ask where that money would go. After all, there’s no harm in having investors profit from this stimulus as well.

A counter-argument is that the absence of one monthly payment may not provide enough money to make an impact. However, Senator Elizabeth Warren referred to the effect student loans have in preventing many in the millennial and Gen-Z generations from pursuing big picture life goals such as buying a house, starting a business, or starting a family.

With that in mind, we’ve put together this special presentation that looks at 7 stocks that are likely to benefit if borrowers are set free from the burden of student loans.

View the "7 Stocks to Watch When Student Debt Forgiveness Gets Passed".

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