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T   15.93 (-0.99%)
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PFE   44.12 (-0.76%)
NFLX   236.73 (-1.67%)
S&P 500   3,783.28 (-0.20%)
DOW   30,273.87 (-0.14%)
QQQ   281.98 (-0.05%)
AAPL   146.40 (+0.21%)
MSFT   249.20 (+0.13%)
META   138.98 (-0.93%)
GOOGL   101.43 (-0.21%)
AMZN   120.95 (-0.12%)
TSLA   240.81 (-3.46%)
NVDA   132.09 (+0.32%)
NIO   16.04 (-4.12%)
BABA   84.39 (+0.33%)
AMD   67.94 (+0.06%)
T   15.93 (-0.99%)
MU   54.73 (+1.43%)
CGC   3.07 (-2.23%)
F   12.51 (+1.21%)
GE   67.44 (-0.15%)
DIS   100.80 (-0.63%)
AMC   7.33 (-6.39%)
PYPL   93.83 (+1.12%)
PFE   44.12 (-0.76%)
NFLX   236.73 (-1.67%)
S&P 500   3,783.28 (-0.20%)
DOW   30,273.87 (-0.14%)
QQQ   281.98 (-0.05%)
AAPL   146.40 (+0.21%)
MSFT   249.20 (+0.13%)
META   138.98 (-0.93%)
GOOGL   101.43 (-0.21%)
AMZN   120.95 (-0.12%)
TSLA   240.81 (-3.46%)
NVDA   132.09 (+0.32%)
NIO   16.04 (-4.12%)
BABA   84.39 (+0.33%)
AMD   67.94 (+0.06%)
T   15.93 (-0.99%)
MU   54.73 (+1.43%)
CGC   3.07 (-2.23%)
F   12.51 (+1.21%)
GE   67.44 (-0.15%)
DIS   100.80 (-0.63%)
AMC   7.33 (-6.39%)
PYPL   93.83 (+1.12%)
PFE   44.12 (-0.76%)
NFLX   236.73 (-1.67%)
S&P 500   3,783.28 (-0.20%)
DOW   30,273.87 (-0.14%)
QQQ   281.98 (-0.05%)
AAPL   146.40 (+0.21%)
MSFT   249.20 (+0.13%)
META   138.98 (-0.93%)
GOOGL   101.43 (-0.21%)
AMZN   120.95 (-0.12%)
TSLA   240.81 (-3.46%)
NVDA   132.09 (+0.32%)
NIO   16.04 (-4.12%)
BABA   84.39 (+0.33%)
AMD   67.94 (+0.06%)
T   15.93 (-0.99%)
MU   54.73 (+1.43%)
CGC   3.07 (-2.23%)
F   12.51 (+1.21%)
GE   67.44 (-0.15%)
DIS   100.80 (-0.63%)
AMC   7.33 (-6.39%)
PYPL   93.83 (+1.12%)
PFE   44.12 (-0.76%)
NFLX   236.73 (-1.67%)

Moscow-held regions of Ukraine vote whether to join Russia


A military vehicle drives along a street with a billboard that reads: "With Russia forever, September 27", prior to a referendum in Luhansk, Luhansk People's Republic controlled by Russia-backed separatists, eastern Ukraine, Thursday, Sept. 22, 2022. Four occupied regions in Ukraine are set to start voting Friday Sept. 23, 2022 in Kremlin-engineered referendums on whether to become part of Russia, setting the stage for Moscow to annex the areas in a sharp escalation of the nearly seven-month war. (AP Photo/File)

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Voting began Friday in Moscow-held regions of Ukraine on referendums to become part of Russia, Russian-backed officials there said.

The Kremlin-orchestrated referendums, which have been widely denounced by Ukraine and the West as shams without any legal force, are seen as a step toward annexing the territories by Russia.

The votes are being held in the Luhansk, Kherson and partly Russian-controlled Zaporizhzhia and Donetsk regions.

The vote, which asks residents if they want their regions to be part of Russia, is certain to go Moscow’s way. That would give Russia the pretext to claim that attempts by Ukrainian forces to regain control are attacks on Russia itself, dramatically escalating the seven-month war.

The referendums follow Russian President Vladimir Putin’s order of a partial mobilization, which could add about 300,000 Russian troops to the fight. The balloting will continue for five days through Tuesday.

As the votes was getting underway in the occupied regions, Russian social media sites were full of dramatic scenes of tearful families bidding farewell to men departing from military mobilization centers. In cities across the vast country, men hugged their weeping family members before departing as part of the draft. Russian anti-war activists, in the meantime, planned more protests against the mobilization.

Election officials will be bringing ballots to people's homes and setting up makeshift polling stations near residential buildings during the first four days of the referendums, according to Russian-installed officials in the occupied regions, who cited safety reasons. Tuesday will be the only day when the voters will be invited to come to regular polls.

Polls also opened in Russia, where refugees from the occupied regions can cast their votes.

Denis Pushilin, separatist leader of Moscow-backed authorities in the Donetsk region, called the referendum on Friday “a historical milestone.”


Vyacheslav Volodin, speaker of Russia's lower house of parliament, the State Duma, addressed the occupied regions Friday in an online statement, saying: “If you decide to become part of the Russian Federation — we will support you.”

Valentina Matviyenko, chair of Russia's upper parliament house, said that residents of the occupied regions were voting for “life or death” at the referendums.

The voting takes place against the backdrop of incessant fighting in Ukraine, with Russian and Ukrainian forces exchanging fire as both sides refuse to concede ground.

On Friday morning, pro-Russia officials in the Zaporizhzhia region reported a loud blast in the center of Melitopol, a city that Moscow captured early on in the war. Official Vladimir Rogov didn't offer any details as to what caused the explosion and whether there was damage and casualties.

Moscow-backed authorities in the Donetsk region also accused Ukrainian forces of shelling the city of Donetsk, the region's capital, and the nearby city of Yasynuvata.

Ukrainian officials, in turn, reported new rounds of Russian shelling in various parts of the country. Vitaliy Kim, governor of the Mykolaiv region in southern Ukraine that borders the Kherson region, said explosions rang out in the city of Mykolaiv in the early hours of Friday.

Valentyn Reznichenko, governor of the Dnipropetrovsk region, said the Russians unleashed a barrage of shelling on Nikopol, a city across from the Dnieper River from the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant, on Friday morning.

___

Follow the AP’s coverage of the war at https://apnews.com/hub/russia-ukraine

7 Water Stocks to Buy as the World Dries Up

Many of us will read this and be oblivious to the worldwide crisis. But if the current trends continue, it will become real to all of us soon enough. Most of us learned in elementary school that 97% of the world's water is salt water. And only about 1% of the total water supply is drinkable.

That is becoming difficult math for several areas of the world. A severe, multi-year drought is causing water levels to sink to historically low levels. And the federal government is threatening to cut water use by 25% in the most-affected states of Arizona, California, and Nevada.

And even if we're not put under water restrictions, we are all likely to see higher costs for food. One reason for that is that about 25% of the nation's food supply comes from California. An American Farm Bureau Federation survey conducted in 2021 found that 40% of farmers sold off part of their cattle herds.

 But opportunities present themselves in the midst of crisis, and this is no difference. In this special presentation, we're looking at seven water stocks that look like smart buys as the world grapples for solutions.

View the Stocks Here .

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