×
S&P 500   3,895.35 (+1.31%)
DOW   31,341.12 (+0.98%)
QQQ   293.85 (+1.75%)
AAPL   145.83 (+2.04%)
MSFT   267.80 (+0.60%)
META   171.41 (+0.97%)
GOOGL   2,345.08 (+2.34%)
AMZN   116.04 (+1.50%)
TSLA   726.80 (+4.55%)
NVDA   157.93 (+4.38%)
NIO   22.35 (+7.30%)
BABA   123.78 (+3.91%)
AMD   79.27 (+5.20%)
MU   58.52 (+2.00%)
CGC   2.67 (+0.75%)
T   21.17 (+0.38%)
GE   62.35 (+1.27%)
F   11.58 (+4.70%)
DIS   97.04 (+1.00%)
AMC   13.94 (+10.90%)
PFE   53.10 (+0.66%)
PYPL   74.67 (+1.95%)
NFLX   189.10 (+2.74%)
S&P 500   3,895.35 (+1.31%)
DOW   31,341.12 (+0.98%)
QQQ   293.85 (+1.75%)
AAPL   145.83 (+2.04%)
MSFT   267.80 (+0.60%)
META   171.41 (+0.97%)
GOOGL   2,345.08 (+2.34%)
AMZN   116.04 (+1.50%)
TSLA   726.80 (+4.55%)
NVDA   157.93 (+4.38%)
NIO   22.35 (+7.30%)
BABA   123.78 (+3.91%)
AMD   79.27 (+5.20%)
MU   58.52 (+2.00%)
CGC   2.67 (+0.75%)
T   21.17 (+0.38%)
GE   62.35 (+1.27%)
F   11.58 (+4.70%)
DIS   97.04 (+1.00%)
AMC   13.94 (+10.90%)
PFE   53.10 (+0.66%)
PYPL   74.67 (+1.95%)
NFLX   189.10 (+2.74%)
S&P 500   3,895.35 (+1.31%)
DOW   31,341.12 (+0.98%)
QQQ   293.85 (+1.75%)
AAPL   145.83 (+2.04%)
MSFT   267.80 (+0.60%)
META   171.41 (+0.97%)
GOOGL   2,345.08 (+2.34%)
AMZN   116.04 (+1.50%)
TSLA   726.80 (+4.55%)
NVDA   157.93 (+4.38%)
NIO   22.35 (+7.30%)
BABA   123.78 (+3.91%)
AMD   79.27 (+5.20%)
MU   58.52 (+2.00%)
CGC   2.67 (+0.75%)
T   21.17 (+0.38%)
GE   62.35 (+1.27%)
F   11.58 (+4.70%)
DIS   97.04 (+1.00%)
AMC   13.94 (+10.90%)
PFE   53.10 (+0.66%)
PYPL   74.67 (+1.95%)
NFLX   189.10 (+2.74%)
S&P 500   3,895.35 (+1.31%)
DOW   31,341.12 (+0.98%)
QQQ   293.85 (+1.75%)
AAPL   145.83 (+2.04%)
MSFT   267.80 (+0.60%)
META   171.41 (+0.97%)
GOOGL   2,345.08 (+2.34%)
AMZN   116.04 (+1.50%)
TSLA   726.80 (+4.55%)
NVDA   157.93 (+4.38%)
NIO   22.35 (+7.30%)
BABA   123.78 (+3.91%)
AMD   79.27 (+5.20%)
MU   58.52 (+2.00%)
CGC   2.67 (+0.75%)
T   21.17 (+0.38%)
GE   62.35 (+1.27%)
F   11.58 (+4.70%)
DIS   97.04 (+1.00%)
AMC   13.94 (+10.90%)
PFE   53.10 (+0.66%)
PYPL   74.67 (+1.95%)
NFLX   189.10 (+2.74%)

Ukraine's Zelenskyy defiant as Russia retreats from Kharkiv

Sunday, May 15, 2022 | Oleksandr Stashevskyi And David Keyton, Associated Press


A Ukrainian serviceman patrols during a reconnaissance mission in a recently retaken village on the outskirts of Kharkiv, east Ukraine, Saturday, May 14, 2022. (AP Photo/Mstyslav Chernov)

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Fresh off his country's Eurovision win, a defiant Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy vowed early Sunday to one day host the song contest in the embattled city of Mariupol, which is almost entirely in Russian hands aside from a stalwart group of a few hundred Ukrainian fighters who continue to hold out in a steel factory.

Ukraine's Kalush Orchestra won the popular contest with its song “Stefania,” which has become a popular anthem among Ukrainians during the war, and its victory was a morale booster.

“Our courage impresses the world, our music conquers Europe,” Zelenskyy said on Facebook. “Next year, Ukraine will host Eurovision!”

The band made an impassioned plea during the show to help the fighters still in the Azovstal steel plant in the port city, and Zelenskyy said “one day” the contest would be held “in a Ukrainian Mariupol.”

The president's optimistic words come as Russian troops are retreating from Kharkiv, the country's second-largest city, after bombarding it for weeks, and Moscow's forces continue to engaged in a grinding battle for the country’s eastern industrial heartland, the Donbas.

Russia has now likely lost one-third of the ground combat forces it committed in February and continues to suffer “consistently high levels of attrition” while failing to achieve any substantial territorial gains over the past month, Britain's Defense Ministry said in its daily intelligence update Sunday.

“Russia's Donbas offensive has lost momentum and fallen significantly behind schedule,” the ministry said on Twitter, adding that the forces are suffering “continued low morale and reduced combat effectiveness.”

“Under the current conditions, Russia is unlikely to dramatically accelerate its rate of advance over the next 30 days,” the ministry said.

In the western city of Lviv, a Russian missile hit “military infrastructure facilities” early Sunday morning, but there was no immediate information on dead or injured, said Lviv Regional Governor Maksym Kozytskyy on the Telegram messaging app.


Russia has been targeting rail facilities and other critical infrastructure in and around Lviv, which is near the Polish border and has been a major gateway for NATO-supplied weapons.

Western officials have said despite the attacks there has been no appreciable impact on Ukraine's ability to resupply its forces.

With Russian forces now pulling back from the northeastern city of Kharkiv, Ukraine's military has said Moscow is now focusing on guarding supply routes, while launching mortar, artillery and airstrikes in the eastern region of Donetsk in an attempt to deplete Ukrainian forces and destroy fortifications.

Russian forces control a horseshoe-shaped swath of territory in the Ukrainian areas of Donetsk and Luhansk, which make up the Donbas region, the border area where Ukraine has battled Moscow-backed separatists since 2014.

In the southern Donbas, the Azov Sea port of Mariupol is now largely in Russian control, except for the few hundred troops left in the steel factory.

A convoy of between 500 and 1,000 cars carrying civilians out of the city was reportedly able to reach the Ukrainian-held city of Zaporizhzhia on Saturday, while Ukrainian Deputy Prime Minister Iryna Vereshchuk said authorities were negotiating the evacuation of 60 severely wounded troops at the steelworks.

After failing to capture Kyiv following the Feb. 24 invasion, Russian President Vladimir Putin has shifted his focus eastward to the Donbas, aiming to encircle Ukraine's most experienced and best-equipped troops, and to seize territory still under Ukraine's control.

Airstrikes and artillery barrages make it extremely dangerous for journalists to move around in the east, hindering efforts to get a full picture of the fighting. But it appears to be a back-and-forth slog without major breakthroughs on either side.

Russia has captured some Donbas villages and towns, including Rubizhne, which had a prewar population of around 55,000.

Zelenskyy said Ukraine’s forces have also made progress in the east, retaking six towns or villages in the past day. In his nightly address Saturday, he said “the situation in Donbas remains very difficult” and Russian troops were “still trying to come out at least somewhat victorious.”

“Step by step,” Zelenskyy said, “we are forcing the occupants to leave the Ukrainian land.”

Kharkiv, which is near the Russian border and only 80 kilometers (50 miles) southwest of the Russian city of Belgorod, has undergone weeks of intense shelling. The largely Russian-speaking city with a prewar population of 1.4 million was a key military objective earlier in the war, when Moscow hoped to capture and hold major cities.

Regional Gov. Oleh Sinegubov said via the Telegram messaging app that there had been no shelling attacks on Kharkiv in the past day.

He added that Ukraine launched a counteroffensive near Izyum, a city 125 kilometers (78 miles) south of Kharkiv that has been held by Russia since at least the beginning of April.

Putin has justified the war in Ukraine by claiming it was a response to NATO’s expansion in Eastern Europe.

But the invasion has other countries along Russia’s flank worried they could be next, and in the past week the president and prime minister of Finland said they favor seeking NATO membership. Officials in Sweden are expected to announce a decision Sunday on whether to apply to join the Western military alliance.

In a phone call Saturday, Putin told Finnish President Sauli Niinisto that there are no threats to Finland’s security and joining NATO would be an “error” and “negatively affect Russian-Finnish relations.”

The Nordic nations' potential bids were thrown into question Friday when Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said his country is “not of a favorable opinion.”

U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken was scheduled to meet his NATO counterparts, including Turkey's foreign minister, this weekend in Germany.

___

Yesica Fisch in Bakhmut, Yuras Karmanau in Lviv, Mstyslav Chernov in Kharkiv, Elena Becatoros in Odesa, Jill Lawless in London and other AP staffers around the world contributed to this report.

___

Follow AP’s coverage of the war in Ukraine: https://apnews.com/hub/russia-ukraine


7 Consumer Discretionary Stocks That May Defy Expectations

Consumer discretionary stocks are those of companies that make products that are popular, but not considered essential. These stocks tend to perform well in a bull market but can lag behind the broader market during periods of volatility. And for the last six months, the volatility that the market has been enduring is adding risk to buying consumer discretionary stocks.

Simply put, consumers will have to be discerning because there are a lot of stocks that will perform poorly. However, like most sectors of the market, it's important for investors to not paint all consumer discretionary stocks with a broad brush. There are several companies that continue to show solid demand remains in place. This is despite high inflation and rising interest rates.

That's the focus of this special presentation. We're highlighting seven consumer discretionary stocks that are worthy of keeping in your portfolio no matter what happens in the broader market.



View the "7 Consumer Discretionary Stocks That May Defy Expectations".

Free Email Newsletter

Complete the form below to receive the latest headlines and analysts' recommendations for your stocks with our free daily email newsletter:


Most Read This Week

Recent Articles

Search Headlines:

Latest PodcastIs The Market Near a Bottom, Does it Matter?

Today’s interview is a little different, in that you get a LOT of market perspective from someone who’s been analyzing stocks from the ground up, for more than three decades. In this conversation, Kate chats with Nancy Zambell, the chief analyst for the Cabot Money Club Letter - and Nancy has a really deep and varied background in the financial industry - as she mentions in this interview, she’s been a banker, real estate professional, and a stock market analyst.

MarketBeat Resources

Premium Research Tools

MarketBeat All Access subscribers can access stock screeners, the Idea Engine, data export tools, research reports, and other premium tools.

Discover All Access

Market Data and Calendars

Looking for new stock ideas? Want to see which stocks are moving? View our full suite of financial calendars and market data tables, all for free.

View Market Data

Investing Education and Resources

Receive a free world-class investing education from MarketBeat. Learn about financial terms, types of investments, trading strategies and more.

Financial Terms
Details Here
MarketBeat - Stock Market News and Research Tools logo

MarketBeat empowers individual investors to make better trading decisions by providing real-time financial data and objective market analysis. Whether you’re looking for analyst ratings, corporate buybacks, dividends, earnings, economic reports, financials, insider trades, IPOs, SEC filings or stock splits, MarketBeat has the objective information you need to analyze any stock. Learn more about MarketBeat.

MarketBeat is accredited by the Better Business Bureau MarketBeat is rated as Great on TrustPilot

© American Consumer News, LLC dba MarketBeat® 2010-2022. All rights reserved.
326 E 8th St #105, Sioux Falls, SD 57103 | U.S. Based Support Team at contact@marketbeat.com | (844) 978-6257
MarketBeat does not provide personalized financial advice and does not issue recommendations or offers to buy stock or sell any security.

Our Accessibility Statement | Terms of Service | Do Not Sell My Information | RSS Feeds

© 2022 Market data provided is at least 10-minutes delayed and hosted by Barchart Solutions. Information is provided 'as-is' and solely for informational purposes, not for trading purposes or advice, and is delayed. To see all exchange delays and terms of use please see disclaimer.