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BA   221.39 (+0.13%)
AMC   40.01 (+0.08%)
S&P 500   4,455.48 (+0.15%)
DOW   34,798.00 (+0.10%)
QQQ   373.33 (+0.09%)
AAPL   146.92 (+0.06%)
MSFT   299.35 (-0.07%)
FB   352.96 (+2.02%)
GOOGL   2,844.30 (+0.71%)
TSLA   774.39 (+2.75%)
AMZN   3,425.52 (+0.28%)
NVDA   220.81 (-1.78%)
BABA   145.08 (-4.04%)
NIO   35.38 (-1.75%)
CGC   13.91 (-4.46%)
GE   103.80 (+0.82%)
MU   74.05 (+0.01%)
AMD   105.80 (-0.33%)
T   27.13 (-0.22%)
F   13.78 (+0.51%)
ACB   5.95 (-3.25%)
DIS   176.00 (-0.14%)
PFE   43.94 (-0.57%)
BA   221.39 (+0.13%)
AMC   40.01 (+0.08%)
S&P 500   4,455.48 (+0.15%)
DOW   34,798.00 (+0.10%)
QQQ   373.33 (+0.09%)
AAPL   146.92 (+0.06%)
MSFT   299.35 (-0.07%)
FB   352.96 (+2.02%)
GOOGL   2,844.30 (+0.71%)
TSLA   774.39 (+2.75%)
AMZN   3,425.52 (+0.28%)
NVDA   220.81 (-1.78%)
BABA   145.08 (-4.04%)
NIO   35.38 (-1.75%)
CGC   13.91 (-4.46%)
GE   103.80 (+0.82%)
MU   74.05 (+0.01%)
AMD   105.80 (-0.33%)
T   27.13 (-0.22%)
F   13.78 (+0.51%)
ACB   5.95 (-3.25%)
DIS   176.00 (-0.14%)
PFE   43.94 (-0.57%)
BA   221.39 (+0.13%)
AMC   40.01 (+0.08%)
S&P 500   4,455.48 (+0.15%)
DOW   34,798.00 (+0.10%)
QQQ   373.33 (+0.09%)
AAPL   146.92 (+0.06%)
MSFT   299.35 (-0.07%)
FB   352.96 (+2.02%)
GOOGL   2,844.30 (+0.71%)
TSLA   774.39 (+2.75%)
AMZN   3,425.52 (+0.28%)
NVDA   220.81 (-1.78%)
BABA   145.08 (-4.04%)
NIO   35.38 (-1.75%)
CGC   13.91 (-4.46%)
GE   103.80 (+0.82%)
MU   74.05 (+0.01%)
AMD   105.80 (-0.33%)
T   27.13 (-0.22%)
F   13.78 (+0.51%)
ACB   5.95 (-3.25%)
DIS   176.00 (-0.14%)
PFE   43.94 (-0.57%)
BA   221.39 (+0.13%)
AMC   40.01 (+0.08%)

US blocks seafood from Fiji ship accused of enslaving crew

Wednesday, August 4, 2021 | Ben Fox, Associated Press


In this March 23, 2016 file photo, tuna caught by foreign fishermen aboard American boats are lined up at the Honolulu Fish Auction at Pier 38 in Honolulu. A tuna fishing boat based in the Pacific island nation of Fiji that has been accused of essentially enslaving its crew was blocked Wednesday, Aug. 4, 2021, from importing seafood in the United States, part of an increasing effort to keep goods produced with forced labor from entering the country. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — A tuna fishing boat based in the Pacific island nation of Fiji that has been accused of essentially enslaving its crew was blocked Wednesday from importing seafood into the United States, part of an increasing effort to keep goods produced with forced labor from entering the country.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection issued an order to stop any shipments in American ports from the Hangton No. 112, a longliner operated by a Chinese national, after the agency determined there was credible evidence that the crew was subjected to conditions defined as forced labor under international standards.

It's the latest in a series of such orders targeting Asian fishing vessels amid reports that crews made up largely of vulnerable migrant workers from poorer countries are subjected to horrific conditions by operators traveling farther at sea and for longer periods as fish populations decline worldwide.

“Foreign fishing vessels like the Hangton No. 112 continue to lure vulnerable migrant workers into forced labor situations so that they can sell seafood below market value, which threatens the livelihoods of American fishermen,” CBP Acting Commissioner Troy Miller said in a statement released ahead of the announcement of the order. “CBP will continue to stand up against these vessels’ abusive labor practices by preventing the introduction of their unethically harvested seafood into the U.S. market.”

Records show about $40 million in tuna and other fish from the Hangton No. 112 have been imported into the U.S. market in recent years despite industry efforts to address the issue, said Ana Hinojosa, executive director of the CBP directorate that investigates allegations of forced labor. The agency does not publicly identify the importers who received the shipments.

CBP said its investigation found evidence that the crew of the Hangton 112 had wages improperly withheld from them, their identity documents were taken and they were kept in “debt bondage,” which typically involves charging workers an excessive amount in advance for travel and other expenses and holding them until they worked to pay if off.

The agency found additional conditions that were “difficult to read,” Hinojosa said, even considering that fishing is a notoriously difficult and dangerous industry. “I wouldn’t call it a fun job, but there are certain protections of human rights that are expected in any kind of working environment."

In May, the U.S. blocked imports of seafood from the entire fleet of a Chinese company with more than 30 ships that authorities say forced crew members to work in slave-like conditions that led to the deaths of several Indonesian fishermen last year. CBP has also issued orders against individual vessels from Taiwan and elsewhere.

The 102-foot (34-meter) Hangton No. 112 operates with a crew of about a dozen, according to online records. The boat was cited in a December 2019 investigative report by Greenpeace Southeast Asia and the Indonesian Migrant Workers Union that documented abusive conditions in the Pacific fishing fleet. The operator denied the allegations at the time.

Advocates such as Greenpeace say migrant workers, often from the Philippines and Indonesia, are particularly vulnerable to abusive labor conditions, with brokers often taking a cut of their wages and ship operators and companies forcing them to work extreme hours and endure brutal treatment, in one of the most dangerous occupations, with no recourse and no way to escape while at sea.

In recent years, the issue of unregulated fishing has gained increased attention not just for the abusive treatment of workers but also the damage it does to the environment, economies around the world and food supply.

An investigation of the fishing industry by The Associated Press, which received the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Public Service, resulted in the freeing of more than 2,000 slaves and traced seafood they caught to supermarkets and pet food providers around the U.S.


7 Stocks to Buy Now and Avoid a Summer Swoon

Summer is generally a quiet time in the markets. Institutional investors, generally speaking, take some time away. In fact, that’s where the idiom “Sell in May and Go Away” comes from.

But quiet doesn’t mean uneventful. The world still moves along even in the lazy months of summer. And at the moment, there are two conflicting views driving the market.

One is the fear that everything’s a bubble that is just about to burst. We don’t recommend you get out of stocks, but let’s face it, things are more than just a little frothy.

But there’s another view summarized by the acronym, YOLO (as in You Only Live Once). And these investors are committed to keeping the markets going higher. Even if it means going “all in” (whatever that means to them) on risky asset classes like NFTs or Dogecoin.

We sincerely hope you take time to recharge (whatever that means to you) this summer. Whatever your personal beliefs, the reopening of our economy is a moment that deserves to be celebrated by all of us. But before you do, we recommend that you take a peek at these seven stocks that you can consider adding to your portfolio before you check out for the summer. These are likely to get as hot as a firecracker on the Fourth of July and should have you smiling when the summer ends.

View the "7 Stocks to Buy Now and Avoid a Summer Swoon".


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