S&P 500   3,585.62
DOW   28,725.51
QQQ   267.26
Why This Bear Market Is Not Even Close to Being Done…
Can A.I. Launch You into Your Next Trading Frontier? (Ad)pixel
Denmark says Nord Stream 1 natural gas pipeline has also stopped leaking
Denmark says Nord Stream 1 pipelines stop leaking
The 3-Stock Retirement Blueprint (Ad)
Brazil holds historic election with Lula against Bolsonaro
US shift away from coal hits tribal community in New Mexico
The 3-Stock Retirement Blueprint (Ad)
Tesla sales bounce back in Q3 but fall short of estimates
Allies aim for risky Russian oil price cap as winter nears
S&P 500   3,585.62
DOW   28,725.51
QQQ   267.26
Why This Bear Market Is Not Even Close to Being Done…
Can A.I. Launch You into Your Next Trading Frontier? (Ad)pixel
Denmark says Nord Stream 1 natural gas pipeline has also stopped leaking
Denmark says Nord Stream 1 pipelines stop leaking
The 3-Stock Retirement Blueprint (Ad)
Brazil holds historic election with Lula against Bolsonaro
US shift away from coal hits tribal community in New Mexico
The 3-Stock Retirement Blueprint (Ad)
Tesla sales bounce back in Q3 but fall short of estimates
Allies aim for risky Russian oil price cap as winter nears
S&P 500   3,585.62
DOW   28,725.51
QQQ   267.26
Why This Bear Market Is Not Even Close to Being Done…
Can A.I. Launch You into Your Next Trading Frontier? (Ad)pixel
Denmark says Nord Stream 1 natural gas pipeline has also stopped leaking
Denmark says Nord Stream 1 pipelines stop leaking
The 3-Stock Retirement Blueprint (Ad)
Brazil holds historic election with Lula against Bolsonaro
US shift away from coal hits tribal community in New Mexico
The 3-Stock Retirement Blueprint (Ad)
Tesla sales bounce back in Q3 but fall short of estimates
Allies aim for risky Russian oil price cap as winter nears
S&P 500   3,585.62
DOW   28,725.51
QQQ   267.26
Why This Bear Market Is Not Even Close to Being Done…
Can A.I. Launch You into Your Next Trading Frontier? (Ad)pixel
Denmark says Nord Stream 1 natural gas pipeline has also stopped leaking
Denmark says Nord Stream 1 pipelines stop leaking
The 3-Stock Retirement Blueprint (Ad)
Brazil holds historic election with Lula against Bolsonaro
US shift away from coal hits tribal community in New Mexico
The 3-Stock Retirement Blueprint (Ad)
Tesla sales bounce back in Q3 but fall short of estimates
Allies aim for risky Russian oil price cap as winter nears

Dow sinks to 2022 low as recession fears roil world markets


An NYSE sign is seen on the floor at the New York Stock Exchange in New York, Wednesday, June 15, 2022. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

Stocks fell sharply worldwide Friday on worries an already slowing global economy could fall into recession as central banks raise the pressure with additional interest rate hikes.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 1.6%, closing at its lowest level since late 2020. The S&P 500 fell 1.7%, close to its 2022 low set in mid-June, while the Nasdaq slid 1.8%.

The selling capped another rough week on Wall Street, leaving the major indexes with their fifth weekly loss in six weeks.

Energy prices closed sharply lower as traders worried about a possible recession. Treasury yields, which affect rates on mortgages and other kinds of loans, held at multiyear highs.

European stocks fell just as sharply or more after preliminary data there suggested business activity had its worst monthly contraction since the start of 2021. Adding to the pressure was a new plan announced in London to cut taxes, which sent U.K. yields soaring because it could ultimately force its central bank to raise rates even more sharply.

The Federal Reserve and other central banks around the world aggressively hiked interest rates this week in hopes of undercutting high inflation, with more big increases promised for the future. Such moves put the brakes on economies by design, in hopes that slower purchases by households and businesses will deflate inflationary pressures. But they also threaten a recession, if they rise too far or too quickly.

Besides Friday’s discouraging data on European business activity, a separate report suggested U.S. activity is also still shrinking, though not quite as badly as in earlier months.

“Financial markets are now fully absorbing the Fed’s harsh message that there will be no retreat from the inflation fight,” Douglas Porter, chief economist at BMO Capital Markets, wrote in a research report.

U.S. crude oil prices slid 5.7% to their lowest levels since early this year on worries that a weaker global economy will burn less fuel. Cryptocurrency prices also fell sharply because higher interest rates tend to hit hardest the investments that look the priciest or the most risky.


Even gold fell in the worldwide rout, as bonds paying higher yields make investments that pay no interest look less attractive. Meanwhile the U.S. dollar has been moving sharply higher against other currencies. That can hurt profits for U.S. companies with lots of overseas business, as well as put a financial squeeze on much of the developing world.

The S&P 500 fell 64.76 points to 3,693.23, its fourth straight drop. The Dow, which at one point was down more than 800 points, lost 486.27 points to close at 29,590.41. The Nasdaq fell 198.88 points to 10,867.93.

Smaller company stocks did even worse. The Russell 2000 fell 42.72 points, or 2.5%, to close at 1,679.59.

More than 85% of stocks in the S&P 500 closed in the red, with technology companies, retailers and banks among the biggest weights on the benchmark index.

The Federal Reserve on Wednesday lifted its benchmark rate, which affects many consumer and business loans, to a range of 3% to 3.25%. It was at virtually zero at the start of the year. The Fed also released a forecast suggesting its benchmark rate could be 4.4% by the year’s end, a full point higher than envisioned in June.

Treasury yields have climbed to multiyear highs as interest rates rise. The yield on the 2-year Treasury, which tends to follow expectations for Federal Reserve action, rose to 4.20% from 4.12% late Thursday. It is trading at its highest level since 2007. The yield on the 10-year Treasury, which influences mortgage rates, slipped to 3.69% from 3.71%.

Goldman Sachs strategists say a majority of their clients now see a “hard landing” that pulls the economy sharply lower as inevitable. The question for them is just on the timing, magnitude and length of a potential recession.

Higher interest rates hurt all kinds of investments, but stocks could stay steady as long as corporate profits grow strongly. The problem is that many analysts are beginning to cut their forecasts for upcoming earnings because of higher rates and worries about a possible recession.

“Increasingly, market psychology has transitioned from concerns over inflation to worries that, at a minimum, corporate profits will decline as economic growth slows demand,” said Quincy Krosby, chief global strategist for LPL Financial.

In the U.S., the jobs market has remained remarkably solid, and many analysts think the economy grew in the summer quarter after shrinking in the first six months of the year. But the encouraging signs also suggest the Fed may have to jack rates even higher to get the cooling needed to bring down inflation.

Some key areas of the economy are already weakening. Mortgage rates have reached 14-year highs, causing sales of existing homes to drop 20% in the past year. But other areas that do best when rates are low are also hurting.

In Europe, meanwhile, the already fragile economy is dealing with the effects of war on its eastern front following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. The European Central Bank is hiking its key interest rate to combat inflation even as the region’s economy is already expected to plunge into a recession. And in Asia, China’s economy is contending with still-strict measures meant to limit COVID infections that also hurt businesses.

While Friday’s economic reports were discouraging, few on Wall Street saw them as enough to convince the Fed and other central banks to soften their stance on raising rates. So they just reinforced the fear that rates will keep rising in the face of already slowing economies.

Economics Writer Christopher Rugaber and Business Writers Joe McDonald and Matt Ott contributed to this report.

7 Stocks to Buy to Outrun Rising Interest Rates

The latest Consumer Price Index (CPI) reading indicates that inflation may be peaking. But if you go to the grocery store or pay rent you're aware that prices aren't going down anytime soon. In fact, there's growing sentiment that inflation will be sticky.

What does that mean for interest rates? One part of the Federal Reserve's dual mandate is to keep inflation at or near its 2% target level. That means that it's reasonable to suggest that the Fed is not done with rate hikes.

Rising interest rates generally spell trouble for equity investors. Businesses, like consumers, are affected by higher interest rates. Not to be overly simplistic, but hiring borrowing costs means lower earnings. And that means a lower stock price.

However, some stocks manage rising interest rates better than others. In this special presentation, we look at seven stocks that are built to outperform when interest rates are rising. And what's even better, many of these stocks have business models that provide growth when the economy is firing on all cylinders.

View the "7 Stocks to Buy to Outrun Rising Interest Rates".

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