QQQ   444.02 (-0.36%)
AAPL   175.10 (-2.54%)
MSFT   414.92 (-0.14%)
META   498.19 (-0.82%)
GOOGL   133.35 (-2.76%)
AMZN   177.58 (-0.36%)
TSLA   188.14 (-7.16%)
NVDA   852.37 (+3.60%)
NIO   5.35 (-7.44%)
AMD   205.36 (+1.34%)
BABA   72.00 (-3.51%)
T   16.80 (-1.06%)
F   12.74 (+2.33%)
MU   95.77 (+0.65%)
CGC   3.02 (-5.92%)
GE   161.04 (+1.51%)
DIS   113.69 (+1.55%)
AMC   4.32 (-0.92%)
PFE   25.89 (-2.63%)
PYPL   59.98 (-0.93%)
XOM   104.36 (-1.40%)
QQQ   444.02 (-0.36%)
AAPL   175.10 (-2.54%)
MSFT   414.92 (-0.14%)
META   498.19 (-0.82%)
GOOGL   133.35 (-2.76%)
AMZN   177.58 (-0.36%)
TSLA   188.14 (-7.16%)
NVDA   852.37 (+3.60%)
NIO   5.35 (-7.44%)
AMD   205.36 (+1.34%)
BABA   72.00 (-3.51%)
T   16.80 (-1.06%)
F   12.74 (+2.33%)
MU   95.77 (+0.65%)
CGC   3.02 (-5.92%)
GE   161.04 (+1.51%)
DIS   113.69 (+1.55%)
AMC   4.32 (-0.92%)
PFE   25.89 (-2.63%)
PYPL   59.98 (-0.93%)
XOM   104.36 (-1.40%)
QQQ   444.02 (-0.36%)
AAPL   175.10 (-2.54%)
MSFT   414.92 (-0.14%)
META   498.19 (-0.82%)
GOOGL   133.35 (-2.76%)
AMZN   177.58 (-0.36%)
TSLA   188.14 (-7.16%)
NVDA   852.37 (+3.60%)
NIO   5.35 (-7.44%)
AMD   205.36 (+1.34%)
BABA   72.00 (-3.51%)
T   16.80 (-1.06%)
F   12.74 (+2.33%)
MU   95.77 (+0.65%)
CGC   3.02 (-5.92%)
GE   161.04 (+1.51%)
DIS   113.69 (+1.55%)
AMC   4.32 (-0.92%)
PFE   25.89 (-2.63%)
PYPL   59.98 (-0.93%)
XOM   104.36 (-1.40%)
QQQ   444.02 (-0.36%)
AAPL   175.10 (-2.54%)
MSFT   414.92 (-0.14%)
META   498.19 (-0.82%)
GOOGL   133.35 (-2.76%)
AMZN   177.58 (-0.36%)
TSLA   188.14 (-7.16%)
NVDA   852.37 (+3.60%)
NIO   5.35 (-7.44%)
AMD   205.36 (+1.34%)
BABA   72.00 (-3.51%)
T   16.80 (-1.06%)
F   12.74 (+2.33%)
MU   95.77 (+0.65%)
CGC   3.02 (-5.92%)
GE   161.04 (+1.51%)
DIS   113.69 (+1.55%)
AMC   4.32 (-0.92%)
PFE   25.89 (-2.63%)
PYPL   59.98 (-0.93%)
XOM   104.36 (-1.40%)

7 Cheap Large-Cap Stocks to Buy Before They Go Back Up

 

This article presents seven large-cap stocks that are regarded as cheap based on their price-to-earnings ratio. The price-to-earnings ratio tells an investor how much they are paying per share for every dollar of a company's profit.

You can find a stock's P/E ratio by dividing its stock price by its earnings per share. That looks like this:

P/E Ratio = Stock Price/Earnings per share (EPS)

For example, if a company is reporting earnings of $3 per share and their stock is selling for $30 per share, the P/E ratio is 10 ($30 per share/$3 per share). Many investors will look at a benchmark index like the S&P 500 as their guide for defining if a company's P/E ratio makes a stock cheap or expensive. At the time of this writing, the average P/E ratio for stocks in the S&P 500 was   14x to 17x. That is the range we're using for determining if a stock is cheap.

Of course, what is considered a “good" P/E ratio may depend on the market sector. For example, technology stocks tend to have a higher P/E ratio than the S&P average because they are projected to have stronger earnings and stock price growth than the broader market.

Click the "Continue to Slide #1" button to view the first company.