S&P 500   5,088.80
DOW   39,131.53
QQQ   436.78
Warren Buffett uses his annual letter to warn about Wall Street and recount Berkshire's successes
Obama’s 2024 Confession (Ad)
MarketBeat Week in Review – 2/19 - 2/23
Taiwan giant chipmaker TSMC opens first plant in Japan as part of key global expansion
AI Stock Caught Trading Under Secret Name (Ad)
A collection of the insights Warren Buffett offered in his annual letter Saturday
West Africa bloc lifts coup sanctions on Niger in a new push for dialogue to resolve tensions
AI Stock Caught Trading Under Secret Name (Ad)
West Africa's ECOWAS bloc says it's lifting sanctions imposed on Niger over last year’s coup in a new push for dialogue
Macron booed by French farmers who blame him for not doing enough to support agriculture
S&P 500   5,088.80
DOW   39,131.53
QQQ   436.78
Warren Buffett uses his annual letter to warn about Wall Street and recount Berkshire's successes
Obama’s 2024 Confession (Ad)
MarketBeat Week in Review – 2/19 - 2/23
Taiwan giant chipmaker TSMC opens first plant in Japan as part of key global expansion
AI Stock Caught Trading Under Secret Name (Ad)
A collection of the insights Warren Buffett offered in his annual letter Saturday
West Africa bloc lifts coup sanctions on Niger in a new push for dialogue to resolve tensions
AI Stock Caught Trading Under Secret Name (Ad)
West Africa's ECOWAS bloc says it's lifting sanctions imposed on Niger over last year’s coup in a new push for dialogue
Macron booed by French farmers who blame him for not doing enough to support agriculture
S&P 500   5,088.80
DOW   39,131.53
QQQ   436.78
Warren Buffett uses his annual letter to warn about Wall Street and recount Berkshire's successes
Obama’s 2024 Confession (Ad)
MarketBeat Week in Review – 2/19 - 2/23
Taiwan giant chipmaker TSMC opens first plant in Japan as part of key global expansion
AI Stock Caught Trading Under Secret Name (Ad)
A collection of the insights Warren Buffett offered in his annual letter Saturday
West Africa bloc lifts coup sanctions on Niger in a new push for dialogue to resolve tensions
AI Stock Caught Trading Under Secret Name (Ad)
West Africa's ECOWAS bloc says it's lifting sanctions imposed on Niger over last year’s coup in a new push for dialogue
Macron booed by French farmers who blame him for not doing enough to support agriculture
S&P 500   5,088.80
DOW   39,131.53
QQQ   436.78
Warren Buffett uses his annual letter to warn about Wall Street and recount Berkshire's successes
Obama’s 2024 Confession (Ad)
MarketBeat Week in Review – 2/19 - 2/23
Taiwan giant chipmaker TSMC opens first plant in Japan as part of key global expansion
AI Stock Caught Trading Under Secret Name (Ad)
A collection of the insights Warren Buffett offered in his annual letter Saturday
West Africa bloc lifts coup sanctions on Niger in a new push for dialogue to resolve tensions
AI Stock Caught Trading Under Secret Name (Ad)
West Africa's ECOWAS bloc says it's lifting sanctions imposed on Niger over last year’s coup in a new push for dialogue
Macron booed by French farmers who blame him for not doing enough to support agriculture

Analyst Rankings

This page shows the average return on investment (ROI) for each Wall Street analyst's "Buy" and "Strong Buy" recommendations for companies within the selected country, sector, and market cap range. The 12-month ROI, 30-day ROI, and 7-day ROI are calculations of the average rate of return for stocks that have been given a "Buy" or "Strong Buy" rating by that analyst over the specified period of time from the date of the research note. The rankings listed below are based on research reports issued between . Rankings are updated daily.

Learn more about analyst ratings.

Analyst NameResearch FirmAvg. 12-Month ROIAvg. 30-Day ROIAvg. 7-Day ROIBased on

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Choosing Stock Analysts to Follow

A stock analyst is someone who studies publicly traded companies and makes recommendations to clients about whether to buy, sell, or hold their stock. A stock analyst may work for a brokerage firm, a mutual fund, or another type of financial institution.

Most stock analysts are employed by brokerages, banks, or other financial institutions. They typically have a four-year degree in business, economics, or a related field. Many stock analysts also hold the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation.

MarketBeat has made it easy to find and choose the best stock analysts to follow. The most accurate analysts and their firms are given the highest star ratings. Conversely, the lowest-rated analysts and firms are given the lowest star ratings.

The ratings are calculated by how close their "buy" and "strong buy" price forecasts are to the stock's actual performance. These price forecasts are issued through research notes that are posted to clients, the media, and trading terminals.

The analyst's performance is ultimately measured by their recommendations and forecasts' return on investment (ROI). For example, if an analyst gives Alphabet (NYSE: GOOG) a price target of $100 and shares of the company exceed it by $5, with shares closing at $105, then the analyst delivered a 5% ROI for investors who followed their recommendation.

To simplify things, we've calculated the average ROI across multiple timescales, including the average 7-day ROI, 30-day ROI, and 12-month ROI. For those who are "buy and hold" investors, it might make more sense to look for analysts that perform well over the 12-month ROI timescales.

A good ROI depends on several factors, including the type of investment, the time frame, and your personal goals.

In general, a higher ROI is better than a lower ROI. However, you should also take into account the riskiness of the investment. An investment with a high ROI may be riskier than an investment with a low ROI.

Remembering past performance is not a guarantee of future results is also important. Just because an investment has done well in the past does not mean that it will continue to do well in the future.

There are several ways to calculate ROI, but the most common is to take the difference in net income before and after the investment, divided by the net income before the investment. This gives you a percentage increase in net income after the investment.

You can also use ROI to compare different investments. For example, if you're considering two different stocks, you can calculate the ROI for each one to see which would give you a higher return. ROI can be a useful metric, but it's important to remember that it's not the only thing to consider when making investment decisions. Other factors, such as risk, should also be taken into account.

It’s obvious that investors cannot buy every recommendation that they read or hear about from brokers and analysts, but how many should someone choose?

The conventional wisdom is that a stock portfolio consisting of 12 companies is the magic number.

The first reason is that it diversifies your risk. Owning 12 different stocks makes you less likely to experience a significant loss if any of those stocks tanks. The second reason is that it allows you to invest in a variety of different industries. This diversification can help weather different economic conditions and improve your overall returns. 

The third reason is that it allows you to invest in companies of different sizes. This can provide you with exposure to different growth rates and risk profiles.

When it comes to investing in stocks, there is no one-size-fits-all approach. The best way to invest in stocks depends on your investment goals and the amount of risk you are willing to take. 

That said, you can follow some basic steps to create a diversified stock portfolio that can help you reach your financial goals.

1. Decide what you want to achieve

The first step is to decide what you want to achieve with your stock portfolio. Are you looking to generate income or grow your wealth over the long term?

If you're looking to generate income, you'll want to focus on stocks that pay regular dividends. These stocks tend to be more stable and less volatile than growth stocks, which don't pay dividends.

If you want to grow your wealth, you'll want to focus on growth stocks. These stocks are more volatile than dividend stocks, but they have the potential to generate higher returns over the long term.

Once you know what you want to achieve, you can start setting a budget for your stock portfolio. How much money do you have to invest? How much risk are you willing to take?

Your budget will help you determine how many stocks to buy and what types of stocks to buy. If you have a large budget, you can afford to take more risks and invest in volatile growth stocks. If you have a small budget, you'll need to be more conservative and focus on dividend stocks.

3. Choose the right broker

The next step is to choose a broker. There are many different brokers out there, so it's important to compare their fees and services before deciding.

Some brokers offer commission-free trading, while others charge a commission for each trade. Make sure you understand the fees associated with each broker before making a decision.

4. Decide what stocks to buy

Once you have a broker, it's time to decide what stocks to buy. There are many different factors to consider, such as a company's financial stability, growth potential, and dividend yield. You can take a look at this page for investment ideas as well as for confirmation of the analyst’s performance.

It's important to do your research and only invest in companies that you believe in. Once you've found a few companies that you're interested in, you can start buying stocks.

Once you've bought stocks, it's important to monitor your portfolio and ensure that your investments are performing well. If a stock starts to decline, you may want to sell it and invest in a different company.

It's also important to rebalance your portfolio periodically. This means selling stocks that have increased in value and buying stocks that have declined in value. This helps you maintain a diversified portfolio and manage your risk.

Creating a stock portfolio can be a great way to reach your financial goals. By following these steps, you can ensure that your portfolio is diversified and that you're investing in the right companies.

The amount of risk that is acceptable to an individual investor will vary depending on factors such as their investment goals, time horizon, and tolerance for volatility. One approach to managing risk is to diversify one's portfolio across a variety of asset classes and investment strategies. This can help to mitigate the impact of any one security or sector experiencing a downturn. 

Another risk management technique is limiting the amount of capital invested in any stock or sector. This can help to minimize the potential for losses if the security or sector underperforms. Individual investors should also consider implementing stop-loss orders on their holdings. This can help to limit losses if the stock price falls below a certain level.

Ultimately, the best way to manage risk in a stock portfolio will vary depending on the individual investor's goals and objectives. By taking the time to assess one's risk tolerance carefully, it is possible to develop a strategy that can help minimize the potential for losses while still allowing for the opportunity to participate in the market's upside potential.

When it comes to stocks, there are a lot of different ways to skin the proverbial cat. Some people believe in buying and holding, while others are day traders. No matter your investing style, there are always ways to improve your performance and increase your returns. Here are a few tips on how to maximize your returns from your stock portfolio:

Review your portfolio regularly. This may seem like a no-brainer, but you’d be surprised how many people forget to do this. At a minimum, you should look at your portfolio at least once a quarter to see how your investments perform. This will help you catch any red flags early on and make necessary changes to your portfolio. 

Diversify, diversify, diversify. They say that diversifying your portfolio is the best way to reduce risk. Investing in various assets makes you less likely to experience drastic losses if one particular investment tanks.

Stay disciplined. Investing can be an emotional roller coaster at times. It’s important to stay disciplined with your investment strategy and not let your emotions get the best of you. When the market is down, resist the urge to sell all of your investments in a panic. Likewise, when the market is up, don’t get too greedy and start buying everything in sight.

Have a plan Before you even start investing. You should have a plan in place. This plan should include your investment goals, risk tolerance, and time horizon. By having a plan, you’ll be less likely to make impulsive decisions that could end up costing you in the long run.

Stay patient Investing takes time and patience. Don’t expect to get rich quick from your investments. It takes years to see significant gains in the stock market. If you’re patient and stay the course, you’ll eventually be rewarded for your patience.

There are many mistakes that investors can make when trusting stock analysts. Here are a few of the most common pitfalls:

  1. Failing to do your own research. Just because an analyst recommends, a stock doesn’t mean you should blindly follow their advice. Be sure to do your own due diligence before investing
  2. Putting too much faith in one analyst. No one analyst has a perfect track record. It’s important to consider multiple opinions before making any investment decisions
  3. Overlooking potential conflicts of interest. Some analysts may have ulterior motives for recommending certain stocks. For example, they may receive kickbacks from the companies they’re pushing. Always be aware of potential conflicts of interest
  4. Getting caught up in the hype. Many analysts are paid to generate buzz around certain stocks. Don’t get caught up in the hype – stick to your own investment strategy
  5. Failing to diversify. Even if an analyst has a great track record, there’s no guarantee that their recommendations will pan out. Be sure to diversify your portfolio to mitigate risk

Stock Ratings Reports and Tools