S&P 500   4,164.00 (+1.29%)
DOW   34,156.69 (+0.78%)
QQQ   309.88 (+2.07%)
AAPL   154.65 (+1.92%)
MSFT   267.56 (+4.20%)
META   191.62 (+2.99%)
GOOGL   107.64 (+4.61%)
AMZN   102.11 (-0.07%)
TSLA   196.81 (+1.05%)
NVDA   221.73 (+5.14%)
NIO   10.92 (-0.09%)
BABA   105.50 (+0.05%)
AMD   85.91 (+2.66%)
T   19.25 (-1.69%)
F   13.45 (+2.36%)
MU   62.13 (+3.58%)
CGC   2.82 (-4.41%)
GE   82.11 (-0.29%)
DIS   111.63 (+1.60%)
AMC   6.18 (-9.12%)
PFE   43.59 (-0.39%)
PYPL   83.23 (+1.09%)
NFLX   362.95 (+0.41%)
S&P 500   4,164.00 (+1.29%)
DOW   34,156.69 (+0.78%)
QQQ   309.88 (+2.07%)
AAPL   154.65 (+1.92%)
MSFT   267.56 (+4.20%)
META   191.62 (+2.99%)
GOOGL   107.64 (+4.61%)
AMZN   102.11 (-0.07%)
TSLA   196.81 (+1.05%)
NVDA   221.73 (+5.14%)
NIO   10.92 (-0.09%)
BABA   105.50 (+0.05%)
AMD   85.91 (+2.66%)
T   19.25 (-1.69%)
F   13.45 (+2.36%)
MU   62.13 (+3.58%)
CGC   2.82 (-4.41%)
GE   82.11 (-0.29%)
DIS   111.63 (+1.60%)
AMC   6.18 (-9.12%)
PFE   43.59 (-0.39%)
PYPL   83.23 (+1.09%)
NFLX   362.95 (+0.41%)
S&P 500   4,164.00 (+1.29%)
DOW   34,156.69 (+0.78%)
QQQ   309.88 (+2.07%)
AAPL   154.65 (+1.92%)
MSFT   267.56 (+4.20%)
META   191.62 (+2.99%)
GOOGL   107.64 (+4.61%)
AMZN   102.11 (-0.07%)
TSLA   196.81 (+1.05%)
NVDA   221.73 (+5.14%)
NIO   10.92 (-0.09%)
BABA   105.50 (+0.05%)
AMD   85.91 (+2.66%)
T   19.25 (-1.69%)
F   13.45 (+2.36%)
MU   62.13 (+3.58%)
CGC   2.82 (-4.41%)
GE   82.11 (-0.29%)
DIS   111.63 (+1.60%)
AMC   6.18 (-9.12%)
PFE   43.59 (-0.39%)
PYPL   83.23 (+1.09%)
NFLX   362.95 (+0.41%)
S&P 500   4,164.00 (+1.29%)
DOW   34,156.69 (+0.78%)
QQQ   309.88 (+2.07%)
AAPL   154.65 (+1.92%)
MSFT   267.56 (+4.20%)
META   191.62 (+2.99%)
GOOGL   107.64 (+4.61%)
AMZN   102.11 (-0.07%)
TSLA   196.81 (+1.05%)
NVDA   221.73 (+5.14%)
NIO   10.92 (-0.09%)
BABA   105.50 (+0.05%)
AMD   85.91 (+2.66%)
T   19.25 (-1.69%)
F   13.45 (+2.36%)
MU   62.13 (+3.58%)
CGC   2.82 (-4.41%)
GE   82.11 (-0.29%)
DIS   111.63 (+1.60%)
AMC   6.18 (-9.12%)
PFE   43.59 (-0.39%)
PYPL   83.23 (+1.09%)
NFLX   362.95 (+0.41%)

Stock Sentiment Analysis: How it Works

Key Points

  • You can use a stock's sentiment as a barometer of how investors feel about a stock.
  • This can give you insight in deciding whether a stock will trend up or down in the near future.
  • Learn where to find data for sentiment analysis in stock market predictions.

Stock sentiment analysis can be a powerful tool to help you spot opportunities in the market.

Using a stock's sentiment as a barometer of how other investors feel about a stock can give you an insight to decide whether it's more likely to trend up or down in the near future.

In this article, you'll discover what stock market sentiment is and how you can incorporate it into your trading and investing strategies.

What is Stock Sentiment?

What is market sentiment, exactly? It's the overall attitude of investors toward a particular stock or the stock market in general. It can sometimes be used as a contrarian indicator, meaning that when sentiment is high, it may be time to sell. When sentiment is low, it may be time to buy.

Stock sentiment can be measured in a number of ways, but one of the most common asks investors how they feel about the market or a particular stock. Surveys or polls can help investors make investment decisions.

Another way to measure stock sentiment involves looking at the level of trading activity in the market. When there is a lot of buying and selling, it is typically a sign that sentiment is high. On the other hand, when trading activity is low, it may be an indication that sentiment is negative.

Finally, analysts also use technical analysis to measure stock sentiment. This involves looking at things like price charts and volume data to identify patterns that may be indicative of future market movements.

Understanding Stock Sentiment Analysis

One of the most important things to understand about stock sentiment is that it can be very different from the actual underlying fundamentals of the company. For example, a company might be doing very well but if investors have worries about the future, the stock price might not reflect that.


There are a few different ways to measure stock sentiment. One is to look at the price itself. If the stock price goes up, that generally means that investors are bullish on the stock. If the stock price goes down, that generally means that investors are bearish on the stock.

Another way to measure sentiment analysis stock market tools involves looking at analyst ratings. If many analysts rate the stock as a "buy," that's generally seen as a bullish sign. If a lot of analysts rate a stock as a "sell," that's generally seen as a bearish sign.

How Does Sentiment Analysis Play a Role in Predicting Stock Market Prices?

In recent years, there has been an explosion of interest in the field of sentiment analysis because investors are increasingly turning to social media platforms such as Twitter and Facebook to gauge the public’s opinion on a particular stock.

The collective opinion of the masses is often a good indicator of sentiment analysis for stock price predictions. When the sentiment around a stock is positive, the stock price is likely to go up. Conversely, when sentiment is negative, the stock price will more likely drop.

A strong positive sentiment in a stock can also help its rally continue to chart upward, which is an important part of understanding what causes trending stocks.

Of course, stock prices are affected by a whole host of factors, and the sentiment is just one piece of the puzzle. However, it is clear that sentiment analysis can be a valuable tool for investors looking to get an edge in the market.

Where to Find Data for Sentiment Analysis in Stock Market Predictions

You can find data for stock market sentiment analysis in a number of places.

News Articles

First of all, it's important to consider the source of the article. If it comes from a reputable source, such as a financial news website or publication, the sentiment may be accurate. However, if the article comes from a less reliable source, such as a blog or personal website, the sentiment may not be as accurate.

Finally, it's also important to consider the timing of the article. If the article is published after a positive or negative event has occurred, the sentiment may not be as accurate. For example, if a company releases positive earnings results but the article is published a week later, the sentiment may be less reliable.

Social Media

Social media can be a great way to gauge stock sentiment and sentiment trading. You can use social media to track what people say about a particular stock and to get a feel for how the stock will perform.

To use social media to gauge stock sentiment, start by following the stock you’re interested in on social media. Look for posts about the stock and see what people are saying. If people are generally positive about the stock, it’s a good sign. If people are negative, it may be a sign that the stock is in trouble.

One popular community for gathering sentiment information on stocks is Reddit. This platform has popular communities dedicated purely to investing, such as /r/wallstreetbets. Learn more about wallstreetbets and what it targets.

In addition to following the stock directly, you can also use social media to find analysts and investors who also cover your industry. They can give you insights into the stock and help you gauge sentiment.

Analyst Ratings

When trying to gauge media sentiment, you can use analyst ratings to get a feel for how the media reacts to a particular company or stock, which can help you make investment decisions.

There are a few things you should keep in mind when using analyst ratings to gauge media sentiment.

First, analyst ratings can be biased. Remember that analysts are paid by the companies they cover, so they may be incentivized to give a more positive rating. Second, analyst ratings can be lagging indicators. In other words, by the time an analyst rating comes out, the media sentiment may have already changed.

Stock Market Platforms

Finally, you can use stock market platforms like MarketBeat to quickly perform sentiment analysis on a given stock. When you navigate to a stock's profile page, you can see its sentiment analysis at a glance by viewing the "news sentiment" section.

This tool automatically ranks the sentiment of recent news articles about a given stock, giving you a birds-eye view of how investors feel about it.

We also offer a feature to help you find MarketBeat stock trending in the news, as well as a list of trending Reddit stocks.

How to Do a Sentiment Analysis

Here are the steps of how to do sentiment analysis on a single stock or a basket of stocks.

Step 1: Build a list of stocks and gather data.

In order to build a list of stocks for sentiment analysis, start by identifying the source of the data that you'll use. You can choose from a few different options:

Twitter is a popular choice for sentiment analysis, as it provides a real-time view of what people say about a particular topic. You can use Twitter's search API to track mentions of specific stocks, then use sentiment analysis tools to analyze the tweets.

Another option is to use news articles from a variety of sources. You can use a news aggregator like Google News to track stories about specific stocks and add them to your stock list.

There are also a variety of stock forums on the internet, where people discuss their opinions about various stocks. You can use a forum search engine like BoardReader to find relevant threads and then compile your results.

Before you begin, you can also take a look at our stock lists to get a feel for the different characterizations of stocks out there.

Step 2: Clean and organize the data. 

Here are a few tips on how to clean and organize data for sentiment analysis:

  1. Remove any duplicate data. You can do this by keeping only one copy of each record or by deduping the data.
  2. Remove any data not relevant to the sentiment analysis. Filtering it by certain criteria can help.
  3. Organize the data into a format that the sentiment analysis software can easily process. You can do this by creating a dataframe with the relevant columns and rows.
  4. Save the cleaned and organized data. Use a formula easily accessed and used for future sentiment analysis. For example, you can export the data frame to a CSV file.

Step 3: Analyze the data.

Consider using a technique called natural language processing (NLP) to analyze the data. NLP is a way to analyze text data and extract meaning from it. NLP can be used to identify positive or negative sentiments in a text and you can use it to identify keywords and phrases associated with certain stocks.

You can also look at the stock price data itself using technical analysis or fundamental analysis. Technical analysis looks at the past price data of stock to try to predict future price movements. Fundamental analysis looks at the underlying factors that affect a company's stock price, such as earnings, revenue and expenses.

Step 4: Use the data.

Investors can use sentiment data in a few ways.

They can use sentiment data to confirm other investment signals. For example, if a stock shows positive price momentum and the sentiment data is also bullish, this can be a strong confirmation signal that the stock will likely continue moving higher.

Sentiment data can also help identify potential reversals. If a stock moves higher but the sentiment data has started to turn bearish, the stock may be due for a pullback.

Finally, you can also use sentiment data to help set realistic expectations. For example, if a stock moves higher but the sentiment data is relatively muted, this may indicate not a lot of upside potential in the stock.

Real-World Example of How to Use Sentiment Analysis

If you gather tweets using the Twitter API and find that the sentiment has turned negative about a stock, it might then be a good idea to avoid investing in it.

Conversely, if you find that the sentiment has turned positive, it might be a bullish sign.

Sentiment Analysis Help You Make Stock Decisions

Sentiment analysis can be a powerful tool to use alongside other stock investing techniques such as technical and fundamental analysis. However, don't rely upon it exclusively — it works best when paired with other methods.

FAQs

Here's a list of the most frequently asked questions about how to use sentiment analysis in stock investing.

What is the best sentiment indicator?

There are many different ways to measure sentiment in the stock market, and each has its own advantages and disadvantages. One popular sentiment indicator includes the VIX index.

The VIX index is a measure of implied volatility in the stock market. Sometimes referred to as the "fear index," a high VIX reading indicates that investors expect a lot of volatility in the market.

How do I learn about share market sentiment?

You can best learn how and how to perform share market sentiment analysis by following the steps found in this guide. There are also more technical tutorials available on sites such as Github.

How do you do a market sentiment analysis?

First, you should create a list of stocks, clean and organize the data you have gathered. Finally, analyze it and incorporate it as part of your investing strategy.

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Matthew North

About Matthew North

Contributing Author: Technology, Technical Analyst

Matthew is a freelance writer and equity analyst who started out by writing coverage on the cryptocurrency market and on emerging technologies. His work on artificial intelligence has been published by the NewScientist magazine and he is a former contributor to FXStreet. Before becoming an analyst, Matthew was a team member of several prominent startups in the crypto and fintech space. Matthew now specializes in covering companies in the technology sector and seeks to uncover stocks and entries with an asymmetric risk to reward ratio.
Contact Matthew North via email at darknetnz@gmail.com.

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