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QQQ   341.10 (-1.01%)
AAPL   159.22 (-0.29%)
MSFT   299.84 (+1.05%)
FB   294.64 (+0.00%)
GOOGL   2,580.10 (-0.18%)
AMZN   2,792.75 (+0.55%)
TSLA   829.10 (-11.55%)
NVDA   219.44 (-3.64%)
BABA   111.79 (-1.39%)
NIO   21.11 (-6.84%)
AMD   102.60 (-7.33%)
CGC   6.85 (-5.26%)
MU   78.72 (-3.96%)
GE   89.90 (+0.65%)
T   24.12 (-0.54%)
F   19.55 (-1.81%)
DIS   135.42 (+1.36%)
AMC   14.52 (-8.91%)
PFE   53.37 (+0.68%)
ACB   3.79 (-6.65%)
BA   189.75 (-2.33%)
QQQ   341.10 (-1.01%)
AAPL   159.22 (-0.29%)
MSFT   299.84 (+1.05%)
FB   294.64 (+0.00%)
GOOGL   2,580.10 (-0.18%)
AMZN   2,792.75 (+0.55%)
TSLA   829.10 (-11.55%)
NVDA   219.44 (-3.64%)
BABA   111.79 (-1.39%)
NIO   21.11 (-6.84%)
AMD   102.60 (-7.33%)
CGC   6.85 (-5.26%)
MU   78.72 (-3.96%)
GE   89.90 (+0.65%)
T   24.12 (-0.54%)
F   19.55 (-1.81%)
DIS   135.42 (+1.36%)
AMC   14.52 (-8.91%)
PFE   53.37 (+0.68%)
ACB   3.79 (-6.65%)
BA   189.75 (-2.33%)
QQQ   341.10 (-1.01%)
AAPL   159.22 (-0.29%)
MSFT   299.84 (+1.05%)
FB   294.64 (+0.00%)
GOOGL   2,580.10 (-0.18%)
AMZN   2,792.75 (+0.55%)
TSLA   829.10 (-11.55%)
NVDA   219.44 (-3.64%)
BABA   111.79 (-1.39%)
NIO   21.11 (-6.84%)
AMD   102.60 (-7.33%)
CGC   6.85 (-5.26%)
MU   78.72 (-3.96%)
GE   89.90 (+0.65%)
T   24.12 (-0.54%)
F   19.55 (-1.81%)
DIS   135.42 (+1.36%)
AMC   14.52 (-8.91%)
PFE   53.37 (+0.68%)
ACB   3.79 (-6.65%)
BA   189.75 (-2.33%)

Germany shuts down half of its 6 remaining nuclear plants

Monday, January 3, 2022 | Frank Jordans, Associated Press


Steam rises from the cooling tower of the nuclear power plant of Gundremmingen, Bavaria, Germany, Friday, Dec. 31, 2021. Draft European Union plans that would allow nuclear and gas energy to remain part of the bloc's path to a climate-friendly future came under immediate criticism over the weekend from both environmentalists and some governing political parties in EU member nations. Germany shut three plants, including this one, at the end of last year. (Stefan Puchner/dpa via AP)

BERLIN (AP) — Germany on Friday shut down half of the six nuclear plants it still has in operation, a year before the country draws the final curtain on its decades-long use of atomic power.

The decision to phase out nuclear power and shift from fossil fuels to renewable energy was first taken by the center-left government of Gerhard Schroeder in 2002. His successor, Angela Merkel, reversed her decision to extend the lifetime of Germany’s nuclear plants in the wake of the 2011 Fukushima disaster in Japan and set 2022 as the final deadline for shutting them down.

The three reactors now being shuttered were first powered up in the mid-1980s. Together they provided electricity to millions of German households for almost four decades.

One of the plants — Brokdorf, located 40 kilometers (25 miles) northwest of Hamburg on the Elbe River — became a particular focus of anti-nuclear protests that were fueled by the 1986 Chernobyl catastrophe in the Soviet Union.

The other two plants are Grohnde, 40 kilometers south of Hannover, and Gundremmingen, 80 kilometers (50 miles) west of Munich.

Some in Germany have called for the decision on ending the use of nuclear power to be reconsidered because the power plants already in operation produce relatively little carbon dioxide. Advocates of atomic energy argue that it can help Germany meet its climate targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

But the German government said this week that decommissioning all nuclear plants next year and then phasing out the use of coal by 2030 won’t affect the country’s energy security or its goal of making Europe's biggest economy “climate neutral” by 2045.

“By massively increasing renewable energy and accelerating the expansion of the electricity grid we can show that this is possible in Germany,” Economy and Climate Minister Robert Habeck said.

Renewable energy sources delivered almost 46% of the electricity generated in Germany in 2021. Coal, natural gas and other fossil fuels accounted for nearly 41%, while nuclear power provided over 13%, according to the Fraunhofer Institute.

Several of Germany's neighbors have already ended nuclear power or announced plans to do so, but others are sticking with the technology. This has prompted concerns of a nuclear rift in Europe, with France planning to build new reactors and Germany opting for natural gas as a “bridge” until enough renewable power is available, and both sides arguing their preferred source of energy be classed as sustainable.

Germany's remaining three nuclear plants — Emsland, Isar and Neckarwestheim — will be powered down by the end of 2022.

While some jobs will be lost, utility company RWE said more than two-thirds of the 600 workers at its Gundremmingen nuclear power station will continue to be involved in post-shutdown operations through to the 2030s. Germany's nuclear power companies will receive almost $3 billion for the early shutdown of their plants.

Environment Minister Steffi Lemke has dismissed suggestions that a new generation of nuclear power plants might prompt Germany to change course yet again.

“Nuclear power plants remain high-risk facilities that produce highly radioactive atomic waste,” she told the Funke media group this week.

A final decision has yet to be taken about where to store the most potent nuclear waste produced in German power plants. Experts say some material will remain dangerously radioactive for 35,000 generations.

___

Follow AP's coverage of climate news at http://apnews.com/hub/climate


7 Clean Energy Stocks to Buy As Climate Change Initiatives Heat Up

Climate change remains a polarizing political issue. However, as an investor, it’s a debate that bears watching. And that’s not just the case for environmental, social, and governance (ESG) investors. Every investor that’s looking to profit from the current $3.5 trillion infrastructure bill needs to pay attention to the current debate about climate change.

That’s because right now the business of climate change is beginning to catch up to the emotion. And that makes it a good time to invest in the clean energy sector. This includes solar and wind stocks. But it also includes other related sectors such as electric vehicle charging and other renewable energy sources such as renewable natural gas (RNG).

That’s the topic of this special presentation which looks at 7 clean energy stocks that look like strong buys as the Biden administration looks to pass its sweeping infrastructure bill.

Investors need to be able to skate to where the puck is moving. For years, climate change initiatives have been bogged down by the reality that the technology was not ready to meet the moment. That is rapidly becoming a non-issue. And that makes this sector one that investors can’t afford to ignore.

View the "7 Clean Energy Stocks to Buy As Climate Change Initiatives Heat Up".


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