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GILD   66.94 (-0.06%)
S&P 500   3,841.47 (-0.30%)
DOW   30,996.98 (-0.57%)
QQQ   325.42 (-0.29%)
AAPL   139.07 (+1.61%)
MSFT   225.95 (+0.44%)
FB   274.50 (+0.60%)
GOOGL   1,892.56 (+0.45%)
AMZN   3,292.23 (-0.45%)
TSLA   846.64 (+0.20%)
NVDA   548.50 (-1.12%)
BABA   258.62 (-0.53%)
CGC   33.80 (+0.72%)
GE   11.11 (+0.36%)
MU   82.28 (-3.21%)
AMD   92.79 (+1.38%)
NIO   61.95 (+6.19%)
T   28.93 (+0.35%)
F   11.52 (-0.09%)
ACB   10.65 (-4.66%)
BA   205.84 (-0.76%)
DIS   172.78 (+0.88%)
NFLX   565.17 (-2.53%)
GILD   66.94 (-0.06%)
S&P 500   3,841.47 (-0.30%)
DOW   30,996.98 (-0.57%)
QQQ   325.42 (-0.29%)
AAPL   139.07 (+1.61%)
MSFT   225.95 (+0.44%)
FB   274.50 (+0.60%)
GOOGL   1,892.56 (+0.45%)
AMZN   3,292.23 (-0.45%)
TSLA   846.64 (+0.20%)
NVDA   548.50 (-1.12%)
BABA   258.62 (-0.53%)
CGC   33.80 (+0.72%)
GE   11.11 (+0.36%)
MU   82.28 (-3.21%)
AMD   92.79 (+1.38%)
NIO   61.95 (+6.19%)
T   28.93 (+0.35%)
F   11.52 (-0.09%)
ACB   10.65 (-4.66%)
BA   205.84 (-0.76%)
DIS   172.78 (+0.88%)
NFLX   565.17 (-2.53%)
GILD   66.94 (-0.06%)
S&P 500   3,841.47 (-0.30%)
DOW   30,996.98 (-0.57%)
QQQ   325.42 (-0.29%)
AAPL   139.07 (+1.61%)
MSFT   225.95 (+0.44%)
FB   274.50 (+0.60%)
GOOGL   1,892.56 (+0.45%)
AMZN   3,292.23 (-0.45%)
TSLA   846.64 (+0.20%)
NVDA   548.50 (-1.12%)
BABA   258.62 (-0.53%)
CGC   33.80 (+0.72%)
GE   11.11 (+0.36%)
MU   82.28 (-3.21%)
AMD   92.79 (+1.38%)
NIO   61.95 (+6.19%)
T   28.93 (+0.35%)
F   11.52 (-0.09%)
ACB   10.65 (-4.66%)
BA   205.84 (-0.76%)
DIS   172.78 (+0.88%)
NFLX   565.17 (-2.53%)
GILD   66.94 (-0.06%)
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Global shares mostly rise after Wall Street's pause

Thursday, November 26, 2020 | Yuri Kageyama, AP Business Writer


A currency trader talks on the phone near the screens showing the foreign exchange rates at the foreign exchange dealing room in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020. Asian shares were mixed Thursday, after Wall Street took a pause from the optimism underlined in a record-setting climb earlier in the week. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

TOKYO (AP) — Global shares were mostly higher Thursday, although Wall Street had taken a pause from the market optimism underlined in a record-setting climb earlier in the week.

U.S. markets will be closed Thursday for the Thanksgiving holiday. They will be open for half the day on Friday, closing at 1 p.m. Eastern.

France's CAC 40 edged up nearly 0.2% in early trading to 5,580.20, while Germany's DAX rose 0.2% to 13,310.23. Britain's FTSE 100 slipped 0.3% to 6,373.48. Dow futures gained 0.1% to 29,862, while S&P 500 futures added 0.2% to 3,633.38.

Japan's benchmark Nikkei 225 gained 0.9% to finish at 26,537.31, the highest level for the index since the collapse of the Japanese “bubble economy” nearly three decades ago. Australia's S&P/ASX 200 slipped 0.7% to 6,636.40, but South Korea's Kospi edged up 0.9% to 2,625.91. Hong Kong's Hang Seng rose 0.6% to 26,819.45, while the Shanghai Composite was up 0.2% at 3,369.73.

The upbeat mood earlier in the week was set off by news of the development of coronavirus vaccines and treatments.

A reality check then appeared to be setting in amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic and a batch of discouraging U.S. economic data, including jobless numbers.

“Investors are still inoculated from iffy data this week, reveling in the vaccine pipeline. Still, they might need to be concerned with more days like this as the virus hits the economy faster than the vaccine rollout evolves,” said Stephen Innes, chief global market strategist at Axi.

Cases of COVID-19 continue to soar around the world, and deaths related to the sickness are growing, hitting more than 1.4 million people cumulatively worldwide. Worries are growing about it spreading during the Thanksgiving holiday in the U.S. In Japan, authorities asked restaurants and bars to close early, and people to refrain from travel.

Recent reports show the number of Americans seeking unemployment aid jumped last week to the highest level in more than a month. A separate report showed consumer spending posted the weakest gain since April.

“The market overall has reached by most standards what we call overbought conditions, and that typically suggests that the market would need to digest the gains, perhaps pause a bit, and consolidate," said Quincy Krosby, chief market strategist at Prudential Financial.

Traders have also been encouraged by signs that the transition of power in the U.S. to President-elect Joe Biden has begun. Wall Street is also welcoming Biden’s selection of former Fed chair Janet Yellen as treasury secretary.

The Commerce Department said U.S. consumer spending, the primary driver of the economy, rose by a sluggish 0.5% in October, the weakest gain since April when the pandemic first erupted. At the same time, the government said that income, which provides the fuel for consumer spending, fell 0.7% in October.

In energy trading, benchmark U.S. crude shed 32 cents to $45.39 a barrel. Brent crude, the international standard, fell 28 cents to $48.33 a barrel.

The U.S. dollar inched down to 104.29 yen from 104.50 yen. The euro cost $1.1933, up from $1.1885.

___

AP Business Writers Alex Veiga and Damian J. Troise contributed to this report.


7 Entertainment Stocks That Are Still Delighting Investors

2020 has created a real-life movie script that many production companies could have only dreamed of. But that dream has been a nightmare for many of the world’s leading entertainment stocks. Movie theaters and live entertainment venues remain shut down. The words “pent-up demand” have never resonated more. Consumers are desperate for ways to be entertained.

That may make it an odd time to consider looking at entertainment stocks. But that would be a mistake. In fact, some entertainment stocks have been among the biggest pandemic winners. This is a trend that is likely to continue as the holidays arrive. The phrase “home for the holidays” is likely to have a new meaning this year. That means consumers will still be looking for ways to be entertained. And now is the time for you to prepare your portfolio for that move.

To be clear, the novel coronavirus was not due to poor management from any company. And you can bet that in the future, many companies will leave some room in their balance sheet for future “acts of God.” But in the meantime, some entertainment stocks have been pandemic winners. And that means they will likely continue to be winners as long as the pandemic lingers.

View the "7 Entertainment Stocks That Are Still Delighting Investors".

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