S&P 500   4,397.94 (-1.89%)
DOW   34,265.37 (-1.30%)
QQQ   351.69 (-2.77%)
AAPL   162.41 (-1.28%)
MSFT   296.03 (-1.85%)
FB   303.17 (-4.23%)
GOOGL   2,607.03 (-2.22%)
AMZN   2,852.86 (-5.95%)
TSLA   943.90 (-5.26%)
NVDA   233.74 (-3.21%)
BABA   123.23 (-5.95%)
NIO   27.35 (-6.11%)
AMD   118.81 (-2.53%)
CGC   7.29 (-3.57%)
MU   81.93 (-3.69%)
GE   96.30 (-1.98%)
T   26.61 (-1.52%)
F   20.65 (-4.62%)
DIS   137.38 (-6.94%)
AMC   17.97 (-0.55%)
PFE   52.79 (-2.33%)
ACB   4.46 (-6.11%)
BA   205.44 (-4.09%)
S&P 500   4,397.94 (-1.89%)
DOW   34,265.37 (-1.30%)
QQQ   351.69 (-2.77%)
AAPL   162.41 (-1.28%)
MSFT   296.03 (-1.85%)
FB   303.17 (-4.23%)
GOOGL   2,607.03 (-2.22%)
AMZN   2,852.86 (-5.95%)
TSLA   943.90 (-5.26%)
NVDA   233.74 (-3.21%)
BABA   123.23 (-5.95%)
NIO   27.35 (-6.11%)
AMD   118.81 (-2.53%)
CGC   7.29 (-3.57%)
MU   81.93 (-3.69%)
GE   96.30 (-1.98%)
T   26.61 (-1.52%)
F   20.65 (-4.62%)
DIS   137.38 (-6.94%)
AMC   17.97 (-0.55%)
PFE   52.79 (-2.33%)
ACB   4.46 (-6.11%)
BA   205.44 (-4.09%)
S&P 500   4,397.94 (-1.89%)
DOW   34,265.37 (-1.30%)
QQQ   351.69 (-2.77%)
AAPL   162.41 (-1.28%)
MSFT   296.03 (-1.85%)
FB   303.17 (-4.23%)
GOOGL   2,607.03 (-2.22%)
AMZN   2,852.86 (-5.95%)
TSLA   943.90 (-5.26%)
NVDA   233.74 (-3.21%)
BABA   123.23 (-5.95%)
NIO   27.35 (-6.11%)
AMD   118.81 (-2.53%)
CGC   7.29 (-3.57%)
MU   81.93 (-3.69%)
GE   96.30 (-1.98%)
T   26.61 (-1.52%)
F   20.65 (-4.62%)
DIS   137.38 (-6.94%)
AMC   17.97 (-0.55%)
PFE   52.79 (-2.33%)
ACB   4.46 (-6.11%)
BA   205.44 (-4.09%)
S&P 500   4,397.94 (-1.89%)
DOW   34,265.37 (-1.30%)
QQQ   351.69 (-2.77%)
AAPL   162.41 (-1.28%)
MSFT   296.03 (-1.85%)
FB   303.17 (-4.23%)
GOOGL   2,607.03 (-2.22%)
AMZN   2,852.86 (-5.95%)
TSLA   943.90 (-5.26%)
NVDA   233.74 (-3.21%)
BABA   123.23 (-5.95%)
NIO   27.35 (-6.11%)
AMD   118.81 (-2.53%)
CGC   7.29 (-3.57%)
MU   81.93 (-3.69%)
GE   96.30 (-1.98%)
T   26.61 (-1.52%)
F   20.65 (-4.62%)
DIS   137.38 (-6.94%)
AMC   17.97 (-0.55%)
PFE   52.79 (-2.33%)
ACB   4.46 (-6.11%)
BA   205.44 (-4.09%)

Omicron keeps world jittery as more information drips out

Wednesday, December 1, 2021 | Raf Casert And Mari Yamaguchi , Associated Press


An international arrivals lobby is deserted at Narita International Airport in Narita, east of Tokyo, Japan, Monday, Nov. 29, 2021. Japan’s NHK national television said the country’s transport ministry on Wednesday, Dec. 1, requested international airlines to stop taking new reservations for all flights arriving in Japan until the end of December. (Miyuki Saito/Kyodo News via AP)

BRUSSELS (AP) — The omicron variant kept the world off balance Wednesday as infections from the mutant coronavirus cropped up in more corners of the globe, with one official lamenting that the wait for more scientific information on its dangers feels like “an eternity.”

At the same time the omicron is spreading new fear and uncertainty, the dominant delta variant is still creating havoc, especially in Europe, where many countries are dealing with a surge in infections and hospitalizations and some are considering making vaccinations mandatory.

Much is still unknown about the highly mutated omicron variant, including how contagious it is and whether it can evade vaccines. But governments have rushed to impose travel bans and other restrictions in hopes of containing it.

At least 23 countries, including much of Western Europe but not the U.S., have recorded cases of it, and the number is expected to rise, according to the World Health Organization. Nigeria and Saudi Arabia reported omicron infections Wednesday, marking the first known cases in West Africa and the Persian Gulf region.

Showing an increasingly complicated web of contagion, Japan reported an omicron case in a man who had come from Peru via Qatar.

European Union Commission President Ursula von der Leyen said it will take two to three weeks before it becomes fully clear what omicron can do to the world.

“This is, in normal times, a short period. In pandemic times, it’s an eternity,” she said.

South African researchers alerted the WHO to omicron last week. It is not known where or when the variant first emerged, though it is clear it was circulating in Europe several days before that alert.

Nigeria initially stretched that timeline back even further, saying it found the variant in samples collected in October, but it later corrected that to say the cases were detected in travelers who arrived in the past week.

Many countries have barred travelers from southern Africa, and some have gone further. Japan has banned foreign visitors and asked international airlines to stop taking new reservations for all flights arriving in the country until the end of December.

On Wednesday, the WHO warned that blanket travel bans are complicating the sharing of lab samples from South Africa that could help scientists understand the new variant.

The U.S. is working toward requiring that all air travelers to the country be tested for COVID-19 within a day before boarding their flights, up from the current three days.

World leaders continued to emphasize that the best way to contain the pandemic remains vaccinations.

For the first time, von der Leyen said EU nations should consider making vaccinations mandatory, as several have done for certain sectors, or as Austria has done overall. Altogether, 67% of the EU's population is vaccinated, but that relatively high rate hasn't stopped several countries from seeing surges.

Greece plans to impose fines of 100 euros ($113) per month on people over 60 who don’t get vaccinated.

“The data is irrefutable: Nine out of 10 Greeks who lose their lives are over the age of 60 and more than eight out of 10 of the people (who die) are unvaccinated,” Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis told parliament.

Slovakia is considering giving that age group 500 euros ($565) if they step forward for the shot. German Chancellor-designate Olaf Scholz, meanwhile, said he will back a proposal to mandate vaccinations for everybody.

Laurence Boone, chief economist at the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development, said vaccinations make good economic sense.

“The G20 countries have spent $10 trillion supporting people and their economies since the beginning of the pandemic. It would only take $50 billion to ensure vaccination worldwide,” Boone said. "I’m just saying."

In the 27-nation EU, intensive care doctors are livid that politicians have not taken tougher action on masks or ordered closings of restaurants, bars and other sites to keep their units from becoming overrun with patients again.

Germany and Austria are among the nations seeing surges.

Germany’s intensive care association warned that the number of COVID-19 patients requiring intensive care will hit a new high before Christmas. Austria, meanwhile, extended its lockdown until Dec. 11.

South Korea, which is also seeing a delta-driven surge that has pushed hospitalizations and deaths to record levels, also extended a lockdown.

___

This story has been updated to correct that Nigeria now says it found the omicron variant in samples from November, not October.

___

Yamaguchi reported from Tokyo. AP journalists from around the world contributed to this report.


7 Risk-Off Stocks to Buy as Inflation Remains at Record Levels

Inflation has gone from a transitory problem that would take care of itself to an existential threat that is moving the Federal Reserve to take swift, aggressive action. In January 2022, the Consumer Price Index (CPI) showed inflation in the United States was at its highest level since 1982.

And the market is reacting predictably with what appears to be a shift from risk-on to risk-off assets. This is having a negative effect on many stocks, particularly in the tech sector, that are no longer justifying their extended valuations.

But investors are also seeing a drop in cryptocurrency prices and other speculative assets. This may be a short-term phenomenon, but if you’re an investor looking at how to make money in 2022; it’s time to get a little defensive. But playing defense doesn’t mean accepting mediocre growth. It simply means moving into stocks and sectors that are likely to benefit from high inflation and rising interest rates.

That’s the focus of this special presentation. We invite you to consider these seven risk-off stocks that look like strong candidates to increase in value even as inflation remains high.



View the "7 Risk-Off Stocks to Buy as Inflation Remains at Record Levels".


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