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S&P 500   3,754.18 (-1.86%)
DOW   30,453.70 (-2.07%)
QQQ   279.29 (-1.01%)
AAPL   138.55 (-0.27%)
MSFT   256.41 (-1.22%)
META   161.52 (+0.93%)
GOOGL   2,174.00 (-0.03%)
AMZN   110.20 (+0.58%)
TSLA   663.61 (-2.67%)
NVDA   145.10 (-0.09%)
NIO   21.30 (-0.28%)
BABA   114.80 (-1.03%)
AMD   73.29 (-0.52%)
MU   54.53 (+1.64%)
CGC   2.67 (-4.98%)
T   20.82 (-2.30%)
GE   60.85 (-4.23%)
F   10.84 (-4.24%)
DIS   94.12 (-2.10%)
AMC   12.82 (-5.25%)
PFE   50.65 (-3.17%)
PYPL   71.71 (+0.43%)
NFLX   178.58 (-0.76%)
S&P 500   3,754.18 (-1.86%)
DOW   30,453.70 (-2.07%)
QQQ   279.29 (-1.01%)
AAPL   138.55 (-0.27%)
MSFT   256.41 (-1.22%)
META   161.52 (+0.93%)
GOOGL   2,174.00 (-0.03%)
AMZN   110.20 (+0.58%)
TSLA   663.61 (-2.67%)
NVDA   145.10 (-0.09%)
NIO   21.30 (-0.28%)
BABA   114.80 (-1.03%)
AMD   73.29 (-0.52%)
MU   54.53 (+1.64%)
CGC   2.67 (-4.98%)
T   20.82 (-2.30%)
GE   60.85 (-4.23%)
F   10.84 (-4.24%)
DIS   94.12 (-2.10%)
AMC   12.82 (-5.25%)
PFE   50.65 (-3.17%)
PYPL   71.71 (+0.43%)
NFLX   178.58 (-0.76%)
S&P 500   3,754.18 (-1.86%)
DOW   30,453.70 (-2.07%)
QQQ   279.29 (-1.01%)
AAPL   138.55 (-0.27%)
MSFT   256.41 (-1.22%)
META   161.52 (+0.93%)
GOOGL   2,174.00 (-0.03%)
AMZN   110.20 (+0.58%)
TSLA   663.61 (-2.67%)
NVDA   145.10 (-0.09%)
NIO   21.30 (-0.28%)
BABA   114.80 (-1.03%)
AMD   73.29 (-0.52%)
MU   54.53 (+1.64%)
CGC   2.67 (-4.98%)
T   20.82 (-2.30%)
GE   60.85 (-4.23%)
F   10.84 (-4.24%)
DIS   94.12 (-2.10%)
AMC   12.82 (-5.25%)
PFE   50.65 (-3.17%)
PYPL   71.71 (+0.43%)
NFLX   178.58 (-0.76%)

Sri Lanka PM says economy 'has collapsed,' unable to buy oil

Wednesday, June 22, 2022 | Krishan Francis, Associated Press


Women wait in a queue to buy kerosene in in Colombo, Sri Lanka, Saturday, June 11, 2022. Sri Lanka's economic crisis, the worst in its history, has completely recast the lives of the country's once galloping middle class. For many families that never had to think twice about fuel or food, the effects have been instant and painful, derailing years of progress toward lifestyles aspired to across South Asia. (AP Photo/Eranga Jayawardena)

COLOMBO, Sri Lanka (AP) — Sri Lanka's debt-laden economy has “collapsed” after months of shortages of food, fuel and electricity, its prime minister told lawmakers Wednesday, in comments underscoring the country's dire situation as it seeks help from international lenders.

Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe told Parliament the South Asian country is “facing a far more serious situation beyond the mere shortages of fuel, gas, electricity and food. Our economy has completely collapsed.”

While Sri Lanka's crisis is considered its worst in recent memory, Wickremesinghe’s assertion that the economy has collapsed did not cite any specific new developments. It appeared intended to emphasize to his critics and opposition lawmakers that he has inherited a difficult task that can’t be fixed quickly, as the economy founders under the weight of heavy debts, lost tourism revenue and other impacts from the pandemic, as well as surging costs for commodities.

Lawmakers of the country's two main opposition parties are boycotting Parliament this week to protest against Wickremesinghe, who became prime minister just over a month ago and is also finance minister, for not having delivered on his pledges to turn the economy around.

Wickremesinghe said Sri Lanka is unable to purchase imported fuel, even for cash, due to heavy debt owed by its petroleum corporation.

“Currently, the Ceylon Petroleum Corporation is $700 million in debt,” he told lawmakers. “As a result, no country or organization in the world is willing to provide fuel to us. They are even reluctant to provide fuel for cash.”

Wickremesinghe took office after days of violent protests over the country’s economic crisis forced his predecessor to step down. In his comments Wednesday, he blamed the previous government for failing to act in time as Sri Lanka’s foreign reserves dwindled.

The foreign currency crisis has crimped imports, creating severe shortages of food, fuel, electricity and other essentials such as medicines, forcing people to stand in long lines to obtain basic needs.


“If steps had at least been taken to slow down the collapse of the economy at the beginning, we would not be facing this difficult situation today. But we lost out on this opportunity. We are now seeing signs of a possible fall to rock bottom,” he said.

So far, Sri Lanka has been muddling through, mainly supported by $4 billion in credit lines from neighboring India. But Wickremesinghe said India would not be able to keep Sri Lanka afloat for long.

It also has received pledges of $300 million-$600 million from the World Bank to buy medicine and other essential items.

Sri Lanka has already announced that it is suspending repayment of $7 billion in foreign debt due this year, pending the outcome of negotiations with the International Monetary Fund on a rescue package. It must pay $5 billion on average annually until 2026.

Wickremesinghe said IMF assistance seems to be the country's only option now. Officials from the agency are visiting Sri Lanka to discuss a rescue package. A staff-level agreement is likely to be reached by the end of July.

“We have concluded the initial discussions and we have exchanged ideas on various sectors such as public finance, finance, debt sustainability, stability of the banking sector and the social security network," Wickremesighe said.

Representatives of financial and legal advisers to the government on debt restructuring, Lazard and Clifford Chance, are also visiting the island and a team from the U.S. Treasury will arrive next week, he said.


7 ESG Stocks that are Leading the Way to a Better World

It's becoming increasingly popular for investors to "vote their values." One way they do this is by investing in companies that make a demonstrable effort to improve the world. This is creating a category of stocks known as ESG stocks.

ESG stands for Environmental, Social, and Governance and it covers a broad range of issues. The environmental component is relatively straightforward. This analyzes and measures how companies address issues such as carbon emissions, deforestation, and green energy initiatives including sustainability efforts built into their supply chain.

The social component covers issues such as an organization's commitment to issues like the gender pay gap and diversity but also areas such as data security, sexual harassment policies, and fair labor practices. The governance component touches on areas like diversity within the corporate board of directors and executive pay.

The focus of this presentation is to give you seven companies that are giving more than just lip service to ESG initiatives. One of the criteria used in selecting the stocks in this presentation was the company's Net Impact Ratio. This is calculated from data produced by the Upright Project's Net Impact Model.

The Net Impact Model is a mathematical model of the economy that produces continuously updated estimates of the net impact of companies by means of an information integration algorithm.  MarketBeat captures key insights and presents them under the "Sustainability" tab on the company's profile page.



View the "7 ESG Stocks that are Leading the Way to a Better World".

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