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US stocks tick up ahead of Federal Reserve’s rate decision

Wednesday, September 16, 2020 | Stan Choe And Damian J. Troise, AP Business Writers


A currency trader stands near a screen showing the Korea Composite Stock Price Index (KOSPI) at the foreign exchange dealing room in Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2020. Shares were mostly higher in Asia on Wednesday after advances for big technology companies carried Wall Street to further gains overnight. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are ticking higher on Wall Street Wednesday, ahead of a decision on interest-rate policy by the Federal Reserve scheduled for the afternoon.

The S&P 500 was up 0.3% in afternoon trading, on pace for its third straight gain following its worst weekly slump since June. The Dow Jones Industrial Average was up 210 points, or 0.8%, at 28,202, as of 1:04 p.m. Eastern time, and the Nasdaq composite was down 0.2%.

One of the primary reasons Wall Street has roared back to record heights despite the still-raging pandemic is the immense aid the Federal Reserve is providing. The central bank has cut short-term rates to nearly zero and is buying all kinds of bonds to support markets. Fed Chair Jerome Powell outlined a new strategy last month where it may keep providing support even if inflation rises above its target level.

Investors aren’t expecting anything major from this afternoon’s announcement by the Fed. They are looking for short-term rates to stay at their record low, though the central bank could announce more details around its change in strategy.

“Don't fear the Federal Reserve, and don't fear them making a policy mistake that hurts economic expansion any time in the next three years,” said Mike Zigmont, director of trading and research at Harvest Volatility Management.

Investors may be relying too much on the Fed to come to the market's rescue if it stumbles again though, Zigmont said.

“If the Fed says we won’t ruin the party that's not same as saying they’re going to juice the party up even more,” Zigmont said.

The Fed will also issue its quarterly economic projections, which will for the first time include estimates for growth, unemployment and the Fed’s benchmark interest rate for 2023.

FedEx jumped 6.1% for one of the biggest gains in the S&P 500 after reporting stronger profit growth for the latest quarter than analysts expected. The boom in online shopping caused by the coronavirus pandemic has helped its revenue climb. The company said that the growth it expected to see over the next three to five years has happened in just three to five months.

The day's gains were widespread, with four out of five stocks in the S&P 500 higher. Energy stocks had some of the biggest gains after benchmark U.S. crude oil climbed 4.9% to $40.17 and Brent crude, the international standard, rose 4.1% to $42.19. Exxon Mobil rose 3.6%, and oilfield services provider Schlumberger added 5.3%.

Smaller stocks were climbing more than the rest of the market, and the Russell 2000 index of small-caps was up 1.7%.

Wall Street has resumed its upward lift this week following a tumultuous two-week stretch where high-flying technology stocks abruptly lost their momentum. Big Tech stocks soared through much of the pandemic as investors increasingly bet their strong growth will continue as more of everyday life shifts online.

The gains were so powerful and consistent for these superstar stocks that critics warned they had become too expensive, and they tumbled sharply after carrying the S&P 500 to a record on Sept. 2. But they’ve stabilized this week. Their strong growth would continue to look very attractive to investors in a slow-growth economy if the Fed does indeed keep interest rates low for years as markets expect.

The economy has made some improvements since the worst of the lockdowns in the spring, but the budding recovery has been fitful. Investors say the economy and markets still crucially need all the support they can get from the Federal Reserve, as well as Congress.

“If coronavirus disappears then we’re dealing with normal risks,” Zigmont said. “If it resurges, all the usual things that investors take into account, all the projections for the next two years go out the window.”

Federal unemployment benefits and other Congressional aid for the economy approved earlier this year have expired, but partisan disagreements on Capitol Hill have prevented a renewal.

A report on Wednesday showed that U.S. retail sales strengthened last month, but less than economists expected. At least part of the shortfall is likely because unemployed workers are no longer getting the $600 boost to their weekly checks that used to come from the federal government.

Treasury yields dipped following the retail sales report, and the yield on the 10-year Treasury dropped to 0.67% from 0.68% late Tuesday.

Earlier, a separate report from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development had said the global economy is not doing as badly as previously expected, especially in the United States and China. It projected the world’s economy will shrink by 4.5% this year, less than the 6% plunge it had predicted in June.

Stock markets around the world were mostly subdued.

In Europe, the German DAX rose 0.3% and the French CAC 40 rose 0.1%. The FTSE 100 in London rose 0.8%.

In Asia, Japan’s Nikkei 225 rose 0.1%, but other markets were weaker. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng was virtually flat, South Korea’s Kospi fell 0.3%, and stocks in Shanghai lost 0.4%.

___

AP Business Writer Elaine Kurtenbach contributed.

Companies Mentioned in This Article

CompanyBeat the Market™ RankCurrent PricePrice ChangeDividend YieldP/E RatioConsensus RatingConsensus Price Target
FedEx (FDX)1.7$251.52-0.8%1.03%51.44Buy$271.39
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6 Stocks That May Not Survive the Coronavirus

Companies that are in a shaky financial position may sometimes attract investors in a bull market. Traders seeking a short-term profit can often use an oversold condition to capture a quick gain. But in a bear market, these companies frequently are left on the sidelines.

But a declining stock price by itself should not be enough to scare investors off. What investors really need to pay attention to is the company’s ability to finance existing debt or take on additional debt. Companies with low credit ratings face the problem of having too much debt on their books and an inability to finance it at more favorable rates.

That’s one reason we’ve put together this presentation that highlights 6 companies that may not survive the coronavirus. These companies have low stock prices. In fact, many of them are, or will be, in danger of being delisted if they cannot bring their stock above the $1 threshold. And on top of that, these companies each carry credit ratings of CCC+ or lower and are at risk of seeing those ratings even go lower.

Each of the companies presented here are considered to be among the weakest, if not the weakest, in their sector. If you have any of these falling knives in your portfolio now is the time to cut your losses and walk away.

View the "6 Stocks That May Not Survive the Coronavirus".

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