AAPL   317.94 (-0.10%)
MSFT   183.25 (+1.02%)
FB   225.09 (-0.16%)
GOOGL   1,433.52 (+1.08%)
AMZN   2,442.37 (+1.72%)
NVDA   355.02 (+4.58%)
CGC   17.37 (-20.03%)
BABA   207.39 (+3.96%)
MU   47.91 (+3.10%)
GE   6.57 (-3.10%)
TSLA   835.00 (+3.62%)
AMD   53.80 (+3.98%)
T   30.86 (-0.64%)
ACB   14.08 (-8.21%)
F   5.71 (-2.39%)
GILD   77.83 (+3.33%)
DIS   117.30 (+0.47%)
NFLX   419.73 (+1.52%)
BAC   24.12 (-2.98%)
BA   145.85 (-2.65%)
AAPL   317.94 (-0.10%)
MSFT   183.25 (+1.02%)
FB   225.09 (-0.16%)
GOOGL   1,433.52 (+1.08%)
AMZN   2,442.37 (+1.72%)
NVDA   355.02 (+4.58%)
CGC   17.37 (-20.03%)
BABA   207.39 (+3.96%)
MU   47.91 (+3.10%)
GE   6.57 (-3.10%)
TSLA   835.00 (+3.62%)
AMD   53.80 (+3.98%)
T   30.86 (-0.64%)
ACB   14.08 (-8.21%)
F   5.71 (-2.39%)
GILD   77.83 (+3.33%)
DIS   117.30 (+0.47%)
NFLX   419.73 (+1.52%)
BAC   24.12 (-2.98%)
BA   145.85 (-2.65%)
AAPL   317.94 (-0.10%)
MSFT   183.25 (+1.02%)
FB   225.09 (-0.16%)
GOOGL   1,433.52 (+1.08%)
AMZN   2,442.37 (+1.72%)
NVDA   355.02 (+4.58%)
CGC   17.37 (-20.03%)
BABA   207.39 (+3.96%)
MU   47.91 (+3.10%)
GE   6.57 (-3.10%)
TSLA   835.00 (+3.62%)
AMD   53.80 (+3.98%)
T   30.86 (-0.64%)
ACB   14.08 (-8.21%)
F   5.71 (-2.39%)
GILD   77.83 (+3.33%)
DIS   117.30 (+0.47%)
NFLX   419.73 (+1.52%)
BAC   24.12 (-2.98%)
BA   145.85 (-2.65%)
AAPL   317.94 (-0.10%)
MSFT   183.25 (+1.02%)
FB   225.09 (-0.16%)
GOOGL   1,433.52 (+1.08%)
AMZN   2,442.37 (+1.72%)
NVDA   355.02 (+4.58%)
CGC   17.37 (-20.03%)
BABA   207.39 (+3.96%)
MU   47.91 (+3.10%)
GE   6.57 (-3.10%)
TSLA   835.00 (+3.62%)
AMD   53.80 (+3.98%)
T   30.86 (-0.64%)
ACB   14.08 (-8.21%)
F   5.71 (-2.39%)
GILD   77.83 (+3.33%)
DIS   117.30 (+0.47%)
NFLX   419.73 (+1.52%)
BAC   24.12 (-2.98%)
BA   145.85 (-2.65%)
Log in

World shares steady as OPEC struggles to reach deal

Posted on Friday, April 10th, 2020 By Elaine Kurtenbach, AP Business Writer

BANGKOK (AP) — Asian shares are steady in quiet Good Friday trading after Wall Street closed out its best week in 45 years thanks to the Federal Reserve's titanic effort to support the economy through the coronavirus crisis.

Many world markets were closed for Easter weekend holidays. In Asia, Japan's Nikkei 225 index advanced, gaining 0.8% to 19,498.50. In South Korea, the Kospi jumped 1.3% to 1,860.70. Shares also rose in Taiwan, Thailand and Malaysia. But the Shanghai Composite index lost 1%, to 2,796.63.

European and U.S. markets are closed for Good Friday. The long weekend offers a respite from the drama that has wracked markets for weeks due to the coronavirus outbreak.

Overnight, the U.S. central bank announced programs to provide up to $2.3 trillion in loans to households, local governments and businesses as the country tips into what economists say may be the worst recession in decades.

The Fed’s actions completely overshadowed a government report that another 6.6 million people applied for unemployment benefits last week. Stock investors expected such dismal numbers, and some are looking ahead to a possible reopening of the economy.

“It looks like the Feds are on a mission to blow holes in every dam that stops the flow of credit. And it sure sounds like they have plenty more dynamite if needed," Stephen Innes of AxiCorp. said in a commentary.

The stock market is not the economy, and that distinction has become even more clear this week. For the week, the S&P 500 jumped 12.1%, its best performance since late 1974.

Stock investors are continuously looking ahead to where the economy will be a few months or more in the future, which largely depends on the state of the coronavirus pandemic and on the mass shutdowns meant to contain it.

On Thursday, the S&P 500 rose 39.84 points to 2,789.82. The Dow Jones Industrial Average added 1.2%, to 23,719.37, and the Nasdaq climbed 0.8% to 8,153.58.

While hopes are building that a plateau may be arriving for infections in several hotspots, it’s not assured.

Thursday's gains were capped by another downdraft in oil prices, which have collapsed amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Benchmark U.S. crude oil fell $2.33, or 9.3%, to settle at $22.76 per barrel after investors learned that Russia and members of OPEC had reached a preliminary agreement to reduce production by 10 million barrels a day. That is far short of what would be needed to offset the steep decline in demand because of the coronavirus shutdowns, said Dave Ernsberger, global head of commodities pricing at S&P Global Platts.

Brent crude fell $1.36, or 4.1%, to $31.48 per barrel.

OPEC said Friday that approval of the proposal for gradual cuts in output hinges on gaining Mexico’s agreement.

In currency trading, the dollar fetched 108.38 Japanese yen, down from 108.46 yen on Thursday. The euro edged higher, to $1.0946 from $1.0931.

___

AP Writer Jon Gambrell in Dubai contributed.


7 Stocks That Prove Dividends Matter

Dividends can be an equalizing factor when comparing stocks. For example, you can be looking at one stock that is up 5% and another that is up 7% over a period of time. However, the stock that is up 5% pays a dividend while the one that pays 7% does not. That dividend factors into the stock’s total return. Therefore although the former would appear to offer a better return, the stock that pays a dividend may actually provide a higher total return.

Dividends are a portion of a company’s profit reflected as a percentage. However, this percentage changes with the company’s stock price. For that reason, a common mistake investors make is to chase a yield. But a company that pays a 4% dividend yield may be a far better investment than a company with an 8% yield. Here’s why.

The most important attribute of a dividend is its reliability. Getting a solid dividend one year has very little meaning if the company has to suspend, or cut, its dividend the next year. Investors want to own stocks in companies that have a solid history of paying a regular dividend. Another important consideration is a company’s ability to increase its dividend. This means that the company is increasing the amount of the dividend regardless of stock price. Companies that do this over a specific period of time have achieved a special status. Dividend Aristocrats are companies that have increased their dividend every year for at least the last 25 years. Dividend Kings have increased their dividends every year for at least the last 50 years.

In this presentation, we highlight seven companies that offer a nice dividend and the opportunity for decent growth.

Click on Continue to view the “7 Stocks That Prove Dividends Matter”.

View the "7 Stocks That Prove Dividends Matter".

Enter your email address below to receive a concise daily summary of analysts' upgrades, downgrades and new coverage with MarketBeat.com's FREE daily email newsletter.