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PACCAR Q1 2022 Earnings Call Transcript


Listen to Conference Call

Participants

Presentation

Operator

Good morning and welcome to PACCAR's First Quarter 2022 earnings conference call. All lines will be in a listen-only mode until the question-and-answer session. Today's call is being recorded and if anyone has an objection, they should disconnect at this time. I would now like to introduce Mr Ken Hastings PACCAR's, Director of Investor Relations. Mr Hastings, please go ahead.

Ken Hastings
Director of Investor Relations at PACCAR

Good morning. We would like to welcome those listening by phone and those on the webcast. My name is Ken Hastings, PACCAR's Director of Investor Relations. And joining me this morning are Preston Feight, Chief Executive Officer; Harrie Schippers, President and Chief Financial Officer; and Michael Barkley, Senior Vice President and Controller.

As with prior conference calls, we ask that any members of the media on the line participate in a listen-only mode. Certain information presented today will be forward-looking and involve risks and uncertainties, including general economic and competitive conditions that may affect expected results. For additional information, please see our SEC filings and the Investor Relations page of PACCAR.com.

I would now like to introduce Preston Feight.

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

Hey, good morning. Harry Schippers, Michael Barkley and I will update you on our first quarter results and business highlights. PACCAR achieved excellent revenues and net income in the first quarter. PACCAR sales and Financial Services revenues increased 11% to $6,470 million. Net income increased 28% to $601 million. PACCAR Parts first quarter revenues increased by 20% to a record $1.39 billion. Parts pretax profits were a record 340 million, 35% higher than the same period last year. Truck, Parts and other gross margins expanded to 13.4% in the first quarter compared to 11.6% in the fourth quarter of last year. PACCAR Financial had a record quarter, increasing pretax income by 92% to $147 million due to healthy new business volume and strong used truck results.

I appreciate PACCAR's outstanding employees who deliver the excellent financial results and the highest quality trucks and transportation solutions in the industry. Last year, PACCAR introduced a complete new product lineup of Peterbilt, Kenworth and DAF; heavy and medium-duty trucks. This was a record number of new product introductions and these investments are generating excellent results for the company. Our customers are benefiting from the industry-leading fuel efficiency, while drivers love the new digital instrumentation, luxurious interiors, stylish LED headlights and beautiful exterior styling. The new trucks and growth in PACCAR's aftermarket business contributed to the increased gross margins this quarter. We expect gross margins to continue increasing this year as a new trucks become a higher percentage of the build.

Looking at the economy, US GDP is estimated to grow 3.2% and industrial production is projected to expand 4.4% this year, which continues to provide a favorable operating environment for PACCAR and its customers. We estimate the US and Canadian Class 8 market to be in the range of 260,000 to 290,00 trucks. The European and UK economies are also experiencing good economic growth. Economists project U.K GDP to increase 4%, and European GDP to increase by 3.2%. The 2022 European truck market is expected to be in a range of 270,000 to 300,000 trucks. We expect truck markets to remain strong. PACCAR's industry leading new truck lineup, highly efficient factories, best in class Parts and Financial Services business, and the continued development of advanced technologies are creating an exciting future.

Harrie Schippers will now provide an update on PACCAR Parts, PACCAR Financial Services and other business highlights.

Harrie C.A.M. Schippers
President and Chief Financial Officer at PACCAR

Thanks, Preston. PACCAR delivered 43,000 trucks during the first quarter. We're focused on increasing production in our factories and estimate second quarter deliveries to be in the range of 44,000 to 48,000 trucks. Truck Parts and Other gross margins increased to starting 13.4% in the first quarter. With higher production and a more favorable mix of new model trucks to be delivered, we anticipate second quarter gross margins to increase and be in a range of 13.5% to 14%. Many customers are operating their trucks longer than they normally would which has increased the fleet age. Truck utilization is very high due to the strong economy and freight [Phonetic] activity. As Preston shared, PACCAR Parts had an outstanding first quarter, with Parts gross margins growing to a record 30.1%. PACCAR Parts business model, which is based on convenience and technology, contributes to our customers' success. PACCAR is best in class at maximizing uptime for customers by having high quality parts conveniently available when needed. The success of PACCAR Parts is driven by an expanding network of 18 parts distribution centers and 2,200 dealer locations; 250 independent TRP stores, as well as technologies like manage dealer inventory and innovative e-commerce systems.

PACCAR is continuing its investments by opening a new distribution center in Louisville, Kentucky this quarter. PACCAR Financial Services benefited in the first quarter from strong new loan and lease business, higher [Phonetic] strip prices and excellent portfolio quality. Revenues were $366 million in the first quarter. Pretax income was a record one hundred and $147 million, 92% higher than last year. The silver lining to the industry-wide and the supply of semiconductors is continued strong demand for PACCAR pre-owned vehicles. Customers appreciate the superior reliability and durability and pay a premium.

PACCAR Financial has been increasing its retail used truck center capacity and now has 12 facilities worldwide. These facilities sell used trucks at retail prices, which contributes to higher profits. PACCAR Financial is opening another used truck retail center in Madrid, Spain this year. PACCAR has invested $7.3 billion in new and expanded facilities, innovative products and new technologies during the past decade. These investments have created the newest and most impressive lineup of trucks in the industry. Capital expenditures are projected to be $425 million to $475 million and research and development expenses are estimated to be $350 million to 400 million. PACCAR is continuing its investments in clean combustion, zero emissions, autonomy and connected vehicle programs.

Thank you. We'd be pleased to answer your questions.


Questions and Answers

Operator

[Operator Instructions] Your first question will come from the line of Tami Zakaria with JPMorgan. Please proceed with your question.

Tami Zakaria
Analyst at JP Morgan Cazenove

Hi, everyone. Thanks and congrats on the solid results. A couple of questions from me today. First, can you update us on any red tag units and inventory end of the quarter and what kind of cost absorption impact you had in 2Q? And if you expect any remnant impact in the second quarter as well?

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

Sure thing. Good to talk to you. Well, I'd say on the red tags we are in roughly the same spot now as we were at the end of the year. So we have a managed number of offline and our team is doing a really fantastic job of working through a global issue and getting trucks to our customers. As it relates to cost, our price-cost was roughly even with each other in the first quarter on a year-over-year basis.

Tami Zakaria
Analyst at JP Morgan Cazenove

Got it. Thank you. And a second one from me. Do you expect ship availability challenges to creep up this year as certain automotive production restarts or do you expect gradual improvement throughout the rest of the year?

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

I think that as Harrie announced rate, we expect our build to increase, so we do anticipate some improvement. Having said that, I would tell you that our chips have become less of the issue and more just a general supply challenges in terms of getting all the materials we need into the plants at any given time. And again, our suppliers, our teams, our purchasing teams, the ops teams have all done a really good job working through that.

Tami Zakaria
Analyst at JP Morgan Cazenove

Understood. Thank you so much.

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

You bet.

Operator

Your next question will come from the line of Steven Fisher with UBS. Please proceed with your question.

Steven Fisher
Analyst at UBS Group

Hey, thanks very much. Wonder if you could just ask you to maybe quantify the numbers on those partly completed trucks. I think you said, it's in about the same spot as in Q1, does that mean you had about 3,000 left, I think coming into the quarter? Did those all get shipped and then you kind of came out with 3,000 new ones? How do we think about it? Maybe a little more quantification there if we could.

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

Sure. Fair question enough, easy enough to answer is we did have, like you said 3,000 at the end of the year. And that number is in the low 3000s right now, and it is definitely different trucks. So we get the parts in, we work through them. The teams get them to our customers who really need trucks right now, and then some other issue might come up and we work on getting that resolved.

Steven Fisher
Analyst at UBS Group

Okay, fair enough. And then just relative to the parts business, just curious what was better than expected in the quarter? The growth rate was about double what you're looking for, how much was that pricing versus volume? And if you have any particular expectations for Q2 and the full year on growth rates? Thank you.

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

Well, I'll share a couple of comments and maybe Harrie has some too. But I would say that one of the big things in the parts business is driving growth. It's an excellent team of people and they're doing a really good job of getting our systems connected to our dealers and customers, which is bringing a high degree of stickiness to our business. We're using great technology to ensure that their first look and last look is at PACCAR for where they get their parts. Another factor is, over the years, we've increased the proprietary content of our trucks and engines, which is helping to grow that business and we think that has sustainable legs to it. And I think the other part is obviously there's a lot of freight business out there. So people are running trucks and trucks are running consumed parts, which is good for us. Harrie, anything you'd add?

Harrie C.A.M. Schippers
President and Chief Financial Officer at PACCAR

No, those are the main items. The average age of trucks is going up, they consumer more parts. It also means there's going to be a strong market for trucks for probably a longer period of time. The strong demand for parts, we've seen especially in North America, where we have the PACCAR engine successfully growing and contributing to the parts growth.

Steven Fisher
Analyst at UBS Group

And you can think we could continue to see kind of upwards of this 10% to 20% growth rate for the rest of the year in parts?

Harrie C.A.M. Schippers
President and Chief Financial Officer at PACCAR

We expect the second quarter Part sales and results to be very similar to the first quarter. So, yes, it will continue to perform very strongly in the Parts sector.

Steven Fisher
Analyst at UBS Group

Thanks very much.

Operator

Your next question will come from the line of Tim Thein with Citigroup. Please proceed with your question.

Tim Thein
Analyst at Smith Barney Citigroup

Great. Excuse me. Thank you and good morning. Just a follow-up. Preston, in the comments earlier on the gross margins for the -- your expectations for the second quarter, so just as it relates to price cost. So if that was roughly in line in the first quarter as you roll through more, and if you get that more of the 2022 pricing, presumably more of those are starting to flow through the P&L, how should we be thinking about the interplay between price versus the variable costs here in the second quarter?

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

Great question. Good conversation to have with you. I'd say that we should expect that we should see some improvement as we continue, in part because of what you mentioned, but I'd also make the mention of these fantastic new trucks in Europe and North America being a contributor to that. So as they grow in percentage of build, that's helpful. So those are the positives to it. And obviously there is the supply base issue of making sure we build as many trucks as we can and sometimes that's less efficient than we'd like it to be, but we want to satisfy the customers' demand. So that's the balance to it.

Tim Thein
Analyst at Smith Barney Citigroup

Got it. Okay. And maybe Preston, if we could -- obviously a very healthy market as you hear commentary from your larger, over the road customers, at least from the public guys in North America, and maybe, they don't obviously represent the entire market. So, and, there has been a number of new entrants in North America that have come into the market in the last year or two and you're facing some rather significant increase in operating costs, in the prospect of higher rates, just maybe what are you hearing as you kind of talk to dealers, and again more in over the road side in North America and Europe? Again, we can all see the headlines and commentary from the large public TL [Phonetic] players, but your -- across the customer base, just kind of what's the tone and sentiment?

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

Well, I would -- I understand where you are coming from and I would say that the customers we have are extremely good at operating their businesses and are doing a great job. They have a lot of freight to be hold right now. And they have a lot of request for our fantastic new trucks. So that's putting -- that's creating a market environment or environment of business, an environment for us which should make it strong for a long period of time. As you mentioned, there have been some new entrants, but I think they operate really on the fringe of it. Maybe they're contributors to some of the used truck pricing we see, but I don't think it's really material to the strength of the market.

Tim Thein
Analyst at Smith Barney Citigroup

Got it, thanks. Thanks a lot.

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

Okay.

Operator

Your next question will come from the line of Jamie Cook with Credit Suisse. Please proceed with your question.

Jamie Cook
Analyst at Credit Suisse Group

Hi, good morning. Nice quarter. I guess, first, can you just help us understand sort of what percent of billed was your new product launches in the first quarter and how we expect that, the new trucks as a percent of bill to play out in the second, third and fourth quarter? So I guess that's my first question. And then, can you help us understand sort of how far your backlog's out and what your market share is trending within backlog, given what I assume, some of this success with some of these new trucks? I mean, it looks like your Europe market share went up as well. I'm just trying to get a sense for backlog and end market share trends as we exit 2022. Thanks.

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

Sure thing. As a percent -- first part of your question was as a percentage of the new build [Speech Overlap]

Jamie Cook
Analyst at Credit Suisse Group

For the first quarter, yes, and then how we think about the rest of the year?

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

Right, right. So the first quarter, it was roughly a third of our build in Europe, of the new product, and that will increase in the second quarter, maybe we'll get to the halfway point, 50% of our build as we get into the second quarter, and then increase from there in the third and fourth. And in North America, the new Peterbilt Model 579 and the Kenworth T680 are roughly, again, a third of our build in North America, and those models have transitioned now. I mean, our new medium-duty product, which we build, is probably less than 50% yet transition to the new model, and it will grow through the year. So that kind of covers that.

As far as the backlog look, our backlog is really solid. We're substantially full for the year in Europe and North America. As we adjust build rates, we can create some openings, if we can get the parts for that. So there's some positive area there, but really strong backlog. All the conversations with the customers are that they really need trucks and continue to do so. So the backlog feels solid. And then, as far as our market share trends, as you know it, like in Europe, in our first quarter we're at 17% market share in Europe, which is really strong market share. And for North America, we've grown from 4 -- 28.4% to 28.8% for the first quarter of 2021 to the first quarter of 2022. So, year-over-year growth. And we'd expect to be in that 30%, 31% range for the full year.

Jamie Cook
Analyst at Credit Suisse Group

Wow. Okay, thank you very much.

Operator

Your next question will come from the line of Stephen Volkmann with Jefferies. Please proceed with your question.

Stephen Volkmann
Analyst at Jefferies Financial Group

Hi, good morning everybody. Maybe just a quick follow on to Jaime's question. Preston, by 2023, should we assume that pretty much all of the production is these new products or does it still -- do you still continue to offer the older stuff as well?

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

So, fair question. We'll continue to offer some of the other products as well into 2023 but there is a transition going on there.

Stephen Volkmann
Analyst at Jefferies Financial Group

Okay, thanks. And then, can you talk a little bit about Europe specifically? I mean, it seems like there is a number of raw materials and energy costs and freight and so forth, have all kinds of inflected quite a bit higher over the past few weeks in connection with what's going on in Eastern Europe. And I assume that's a bit of a headwind for you guys at some point, but how should we think about that? Does it take a while to flow into your cost structure? Do you think you can kind of cover it with pricing on real-time? Just, how does that dynamic work in Europe specifically?

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

I think maybe Harrie can offer some comments on that.

Harrie C.A.M. Schippers
President and Chief Financial Officer at PACCAR

Yes, Steve, our cost situation in Europe has not been so much different from North America. So we've seen direct material cost increases and price increases, which have been similar. We're not exposed too much as far as we can tell right now to the situation in Ukraine and Russia. So our parts availability and the ability to produce trucks has been good. I think the economy and customer demand is very similar to what Preston just mentioned. Customers want to have their trucks, they want to have more trucks, they want to have them faster. So, really strong market this year. That's also why we increased the range of our outlook for Europe a little bit this time and we think it will be a strong month -- strong market going forward. So very, very similar to what we see in North America.

Stephen Volkmann
Analyst at Jefferies Financial Group

Great, thank you guys.

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

You bet.

Operator

Your next question will come from the line of David Raso with Evercore ISI. Please proceed with your question.

David Raso
Analyst at Evercore ISI

Hi, good morning. When I think about 2023 and around the industry currently, the orders are being a bit suppressed. When you open your order book for '23, and maybe it's a statement for the industry as well, what you're hearing from your customers? Do you expect orders to reaccelerate given their suppressed today? And then, I'm curious, your view about demand for '23, if you think they're going to accelerate once those books are open?

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

Sure, David. Thanks for the question. We do expect that 2023 should be a good year for several reasons, really. We expect that our new trucks, as I've said, will be a growing percentage of the build. Those trucks, the fuel economy they provide is compelling for people to want to get the new trucks into the fleet, which is going to be really good for their operating costs. So we think that will drive demand. And so, as 2023 gets closer to us and we start taking a substantial number of more orders, we'll see that to be a -- we predict that will be good order intake.

David Raso
Analyst at Evercore ISI

So, no dampening in your review of '23 with any of the macro developments since last quarter, is that a fair generalization --? [Speech Overlap]

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

I mean, there is that view out there, I guess, but as we look at it also, there is the other -- the other view is that the economy is growing and we expect the GDP growth is positive, that freight volumes stay at a high level, that truck age is up 10% to 15%, and then we have fantastic new trucks. All of those for PACCAR are good news in terms of what we expect the future to look like.

David Raso
Analyst at Evercore ISI

Thank you. Then on the deliveries for 2Q versus 1Q, midpoint up about 7%, can you take us through the geographies with a little bit of help on each one sequentially; US, Canada, Europe and other? Thank you.

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

I think I'll offer commentary, you can add anything you want to, anyone else. But I would say that we do expect volumes to grow in each of the regions in the second quarter in contribution to that 44,000 to 48,000 units. And then, specifically inside of that, it's harder to tell because the supply base issues can be unique month by month.

Harrie C.A.M. Schippers
President and Chief Financial Officer at PACCAR

Europe typically has fewer working days in the second quarter, a little bit more national holidays in different countries at different moments in time. So, that would be an offset, maybe a little bit, but we also seen that the material availability in Europe is good. We're increasing production there. So overall, I would think that all regions would make a contribution to the higher production in the second quarter.

David Raso
Analyst at Evercore ISI

All right, thank you very much.

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

You bet.

Operator

Your next. Your next question will come from the line of John Joyner with BMO. Please proceed with your question.

John Joyner
Analyst at BMO Capital Markets

Hey, thank you for taking my questions. So I guess first, and you gave some color in your release, but is there anything else that you can offer on the performance of the Financial services business? I mean, if I go back, say, 35 years, which is as far back as the model goes, the profitability has never been this impressive. So if you can add anything else to that and do you anticipate this continuing for the rest of the year?

Harrie C.A.M. Schippers
President and Chief Financial Officer at PACCAR

The finance company results were excellent in the first quarter. I think the team has done an amazing job creating a strong book of business. Our strong A and B credits. Past dues are less than half a percent so customers are paying their bills on time. Like we said in the press release, used truck business continues to be very strong. I think a big difference, maybe compared to 20 or 30 years ago is the retail used truck centers that the finance company has established. We have 12 of those now that allows us to sell a bigger portion of our used trucks directly to end customers and that helps profitability. So, we expect the finance company to do well for the remainder of this year, although the supply of used trucks could be a little less in the second and the third quarter because customers hold on to their trucks because they're waiting for new trucks. And it again, underlines how strong the demand for the new trucks is going to be.

John Joyner
Analyst at BMO Capital Markets

Okay. Okay, that's great. And then, maybe just following up on that, when you mention the used truck centers, I mean, I guess, how much is left to go there with building those out? And then, I guess, the same question on the parts business in terms of geographic mix -- how much geographic build out remains for this, for that business, both TRP stores, as well as the distribution centers?

Harrie C.A.M. Schippers
President and Chief Financial Officer at PACCAR

So on the used truck centers, we've added a couple of used truck centers, and I think per year, in the last couple of years, made some upgrades, adding another one this year. So there's definitely opportunity to add a few more. I would say that it's still a minority of the trucks we sell, sort of used truck center, so there is still a room of opportunity to grow in that area. And on the parts, Preston?

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

Yes, I think on the parts side of it, if you think about that, I'd say that the parts team is doing as the opportunity for continued growth. We've built out distribution centers. We'll will continue to do that. That puts distribution centers closer to our dealers, closer to our customers, which gets an increased percentage of same-day delivery. But equally important, if not more so, is the kinds of systems we're implementing and the capability to connect with the customers directly and make sure that their trucks are operating the way they want them to and get them trucks and parts that they need every single day. So we use data analytics. We have connected systems with our dealers and we think that has a great sustained future.

John Joyner
Analyst at BMO Capital Markets

Okay. Excellent. Thank you so much.

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

You bet.

Operator

Your next question will come from the line of Nicole DeBlase with Deutsche Bank. Please proceed with your question.

Nicole DeBlase
Analyst at Deutsche Bank Aktiengesellschaft

Yes, thanks guys. Good morning or good afternoon, whatever it is. I guess a lot's been covered here, but can you talk a little bit about inventory. I think if you look at the ACT data, just truck inventory at the dealers have begun to tick up a bit. What is PACCAR seeing with respect to inventory as a channel?

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

Yes, I mean inventory is still at pretty low levels. If you look at it, it was like 2.3 months of retail sales in March, in February 1.9 a year ago. And for PACCAR, we're less than that slightly. So there's still not a lot of inventory sitting out there, and it's really just about the ability to get the trucks from production into the customers hands as quickly as we can.

Nicole DeBlase
Analyst at Deutsche Bank Aktiengesellschaft

Okay, understood. Thanks. And just a follow-up on the discussion around supply chain. So I guess like, I know you guys are embedding a little bit of an improvement as the year goes on, what did you see in the first quarter? I mean, there's a lot of noise with respect to geopolitical risks, like, did supply chain get more challenging or is it kind of more of the same that you've been seeing for the past several quarters?

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

I think that what we've seen is that maybe we've gotten through some of the earlier semiconductor issues and those have not become the most dominant side of it. So other little issues come up now. They could be labor-related. They could be geopolitically related. They could be shipping related. And so, some of them are temporary. I think that what's going on now is we have really strong communication between us and our supply base. And so our ability to manage that is may be improving and we hope, overall, the situation is improving, which is leading us to see that we think we can deliver some more trucks in the second quarter and on out.

Nicole DeBlase
Analyst at Deutsche Bank Aktiengesellschaft

Got it. Thank you. I'll pass it on.

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

All right.

Operator

Your next question will come from the line of Rob Wertheimer with Melius Research. Please proceed with your question.

Rob Wertheimer
Analyst at Melius Research

Hey, good morning everybody.

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

Hey, Rob.

Rob Wertheimer
Analyst at Melius Research

Harrie, I'm sorry, the results were great. I'm sorry to ask a couple of accounting questions in the midst of that. But I noted you switched from life of the [Technical Issue] for US inventory accounting. When I read that I assumed that was just a bit more comparable with European/global peers. I wonder if you had any other thought process around that and I wonder what would have any material to a cash tax impact?

Michael T. Barkley
Senior Vice President & Controller at PACCAR

Yes, it's Michael, that's one of the reasons why we switched to become more comparable with our European peers who use IFRS and don't have LIFO. We also wanted to have better matching of our revenues and costs as inflation creeps up. If you end up accelerating cost realization when you on are LIFO, which we don't think provides very good matching, For years LIFO has been fairly benign and not much of an impact. And with the inflation creeping up the way that it is, it's become more of a thing and distorts the numbers unnecessarily. So, better comparability, better revenue recognition, we thought it was the right thing to do at this time.

Rob Wertheimer
Analyst at Melius Research

Is there any cash tax impact that we should care about? And then, I have one more. [Speech Overlap]

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

Yes, we're going to -- our LIFO reserve is about $200 million. We're going to end up paying about $50 million in taxes, which is, we're happy to do.

Rob Wertheimer
Analyst at Melius Research

Okay, perfect. And then on the finance, to your questions and answers earlier, I'm not quite sure if it works this way, but as trucks come off lease, I mean, do you make more of a profit just because you own them and sell them under a strong market? Was that a material impact this quarter or for the year? And I will stop there. Thank you.

Harrie C.A.M. Schippers
President and Chief Financial Officer at PACCAR

Yes, of course the trucks that come off lease that are our trucks, that's good business for us right now. Those trucks come back in a very favorable market for used trucks and that's definitely a good thing for the finance company.

Rob Wertheimer
Analyst at Melius Research

All right, thank you.

Operator

Your next question will come from the line of Jerry Revich with Goldman Sachs. Please proceed with your question.

Jerry Revich
Analyst at The Goldman Sachs Group

Yes, hi, good morning. I'm wondering if you could just talk about the supply base for you folks in Europe? A couple of your competitors had down days because of supply based issues from Eastern Europe in the quarter and it doesn't look like you folks had any issues, was that a function of you folks using multiple suppliers or a different supply base? Can you just talk about how nimble you folks had to be in the quarter, in flexing if at all, given the geopolitical issues? Thanks.

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

Well, we've noted the same thing with them. We just haven't been affected that way. We've had good supplier ability to provide us the parts we need in Europe. And we've looked out into the future and tried to forecast where that might be, and we'll have to watch and see how it is, but right now, there's nothing that's showing us that we aren't going to get the parts. And we continue to work closely with all the suppliers that have facilities in Eastern Europe to make sure that we're on top of it.

Harrie C.A.M. Schippers
President and Chief Financial Officer at PACCAR

We're one of the few truck manufacturers that doesn't have a factory in Russia. And so our exposure to Russia and the Ukraine has been a lot less than what you may have seen somewhere else.

Jerry Revich
Analyst at The Goldman Sachs Group

And Harrie, earlier you mentioned the strength of the business in Europe, I'm wondering if you could just expand on that? Did bookings exceed shipments in the quarter? Can you comment on that?

Harrie C.A.M. Schippers
President and Chief Financial Officer at PACCAR

Yes, order bookings, I think it's again the same approach in North America as we've seen in Europe. Demand is very, very strong and we manage order bookings, a little bit with lead times, and we see there is some inflation and cost increases and we want to manage that just very carefully. So I think in today's environment we could easily get more order bookings than we need, but it's a function of, well, filling the backlog with strong business and not getting exposed out to 2023 where we don't know exactly what costs are going to be.

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

And I would add that it really -- it's hard to appreciate how phenomenal the new DAF truck is. I mean, it's the only truck that meets all the new masses and dimensions regulations. It's providing a 10% better fuel efficiency. So several thousand dollars a year per truck in operating cost advantage. It's a truck that meets the upcoming new direct vision requirements in Europe. It's really a game-changing product. And it's got a lot more proprietary content on it and the drivers love it. So there's a lot of reasons that we see strong demand for that for our European market right now.

Jerry Revich
Analyst at The Goldman Sachs Group

Okay, super. And lastly, I'm wondering if you can just comment about the evolution of demand for your electric vehicles, how has that evolved over the past quarter or two and where are you folks expecting to ship them? Geographically, is it still predominantly in Europe where you're seeing demand?

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

Sure. We are seeing increasing order intake for those vehicles. I think we talked even a year ago, we said we start in the tens and grow to the hundreds and then get to the thousands. This year, already we expect that we'll deliver in the hundreds of vehicles, and take lots more orders than that for the vehicles. And we're having customers putting them into service and seeing how they work out for them, five or 10 at a time typically, and then enjoying the benefits of what PACCAR quality looks like in a zero emissions vehicle. So, we kind of see that as a growing opportunity and we continue to refine our technology on those vehicles. We feel like we want to stay at the leading edge of technology and it's nice to be actually delivering zero emissions vehicles to our customers.

Jerry Revich
Analyst at The Goldman Sachs Group

Okay. I appreciate the discussion. Thanks.

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

You bet.

Operator

Your next question will come from the line of Chad Dillard with Bernstein. Please proceed with your question.

Chad Dillard
Analyst at Sanford C. Bernstein

Hi, good morning, guys.

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

Good morning.

Chad Dillard
Analyst at Sanford C. Bernstein

So how much room do you have to raise price on parts? And can you just talk a bit more about just your philosophy on pricing? I mean, are you guys -- can you potentially raise price to cover, let's say, like air freight for example? And then maybe you can break down the outperformance of your PACCAR Parts business? I mean how much is coming from just better growth on the engine side versus rest of truck? And then lastly, here, if you could just clarify your comment about parts demand being similar in 2Q versus 1Q? Are you talking about dollar wise or percent growth year on year?

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

Well, I mean obviously it's a competitive market out there. We've done [Phonetic] a team who has done a really good job of increasing the prices as costs have gone up, and we've had some good realization over the few quarters here, largely it's driven by the need for these parts. And the fact that we are connected with the customers more and more right, trucks are getting complicated. We have sophisticated customers and the interaction between PACCAR, our dealers and our customers is a real contributor to growth, as well as more proprietary content like engines, like our PACCAR transmissions. PACCAR has access to all of this, so just helping us flow through a connected position to our customers. So that will continue, and that's great for the future.

Chad Dillard
Analyst at Sanford C. Bernstein

And if you can you just clarify the Parts guidance commentary, you're talking about dollar wise versus percent wise growth? And then just a separate question, just on just how you guys are thinking about how much pent-up demand there is in the industry today?

Harrie C.A.M. Schippers
President and Chief Financial Officer at PACCAR

To go back to the parts comment, that Parts comment was on revenues. So we expect Parts revenue in the second quarter to be similar to parts revenue in the first quarter. Pricing has been strong. To go back to the first quarter, first quarter pricing was slightly over 10%, up compared to the first quarter of 2021. So that just shows you that it's an environment where cost increases are translated into price increases as well.

And the second question you had was --?

Chad Dillard
Analyst at Sanford C. Bernstein

Just how to think about just how much pent-up demand there is, either in the industry or if you can talk about PACCAR more specifically?

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

Sure, I'll take that one. And just kind of think of it this way, is that we've just come through a couple of years where we've not been able to build the number of trucks we need as an industry. We've had really strong freight volumes. People are running them, running their trucks out there, putting miles on them. They have an operating model, which says, they either want their fleet age to be two years or three years or whatever it is, and they've exceeded that by 10% or 15%. And they're probably not going to adjust that business model which is successful for them. So they're going to want to drawdown that age of fleet as they can and that's going to take some time. As the supply base remains constrained, we expect to see these improvements in our deliveries, but they're not, they're not going to be just for a quarter. We expect to see this to be a good period of time for PACCAR and the industry.

Operator

Your next question will come from the line of Ross Gilardi with Bank of America. Please proceed with your question.

Ross Gilardi
Analyst at Bank of America

Okay. Good morning. I'm not sure if you guys replied to this similar question earlier, but what do you make of the erosion in spot rates? Clearly, PACCAR is very positive, but why isn't that an indication that excess capacity is creeping into the freight markets and the demand is ultimately softening, and why would orders reaccelerate in 2023 as spot rates are falling? Thanks.

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

Yes, sure. Ross. I mean, I think that it's a fair question. If you think of spot rates, they're really the fringe of the business. They're not the foundation of the business. And so, I think people may want to use them as the leading indicator, but they shouldn't think of them as systemically covering what freight is doing out there. And so since there is strong business out there, even if spot rates decline a little bit, they're still present, and the fixed contracts are still really strong. So, as long as that continues, it bodes well for the market.

Ross Gilardi
Analyst at Bank of America

Okay. Got it. Thanks, Preston. And then someone asked to consolidate -- and I haven't asked you a consolidation question in a while, and clearly, PACCAR's has gone at it organically very successfully for a very, very long time, but just was curious on your general view. I mean, do you see a heightened need for increased consolidation in the commercial vehicle space in light of all the inflationary pressures, just need for perhaps greater localization of supply chain for just greater overall scale? And do you think regulators would allow a combination of any of the top six or seven -- I mean, some of the European names have really been bruised and battered in the aftermath of Russia and so forth, and do you think, could PACCAR potentially play a role as an industry consolidator in the next couple of years?

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

Well, it's funny that you haven't asked that question in a while and I would simply say, you know what, the way we look at it is business is doing fantastic, PACCAR continues to grow. We expect to keep growing and we always are looking around the world for the best things for our shareholders and I think that's as much as we can say right now.

Ross Gilardi
Analyst at Bank of America

Thanks a lot.

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

You bet.

Operator

Your next question will come from the line of Jeff Kauffman with Vertical Research. Please proceed with your question.

Jeff Kauffman
Analyst at Vertical Research

Well, thank you very much and congratulations. Just a quick question on timing and then another one on numbers. You reiterated the R&D range for the year but R&D came in I think a lot lower than that trend this quarter. I'm assuming that's just a timing issue, but could you talk a little bit about that?

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

Sure. I think you nailed it. It's a timing issue on the year. So, we still hold that 350 to 400 and the full year was 78 in the first quarter. So it should -- it's a run rate for new technologies, some pretty fun projects that we have that we're spinning up that will help us in the future.

Jeff Kauffman
Analyst at Vertical Research

Okay. So, just for modeling, should we think of that more as a back half a year impact as we catch up?

Harrie C.A.M. Schippers
President and Chief Financial Officer at PACCAR

It is a pretty gradual increase during the year, I would model [Phonetic].

Jeff Kauffman
Analyst at Vertical Research

Okay, thank you. And then a lot of detail on new unit sales, but I know you've had a couple of questions about this. What do used unit sales look like on a year-on-year basis?

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

I mean as a general sense, you can say that they've decline, right? We've had -- we had -- about a year ago we were coming into the strong used truck market, so there was used inventory out there. And obviously now, with the strong freight demand, people are holding onto those units. So they're just not coming into the inventory of our dealers or our used truck centers. So it's at a lower level and that's likely to continue for a while. So as far as a specific number to think of it in terms of months, I'd still think of it as there's less than two months of inventory out there.

Jeff Kauffman
Analyst at Vertical Research

All right, that's consistent with the commentary you made about 2Q, 3Q. So any benefit that we're seeing on used vehicle impact of financial services is entirely used vehicle price at this point, correct?

Harrie C.A.M. Schippers
President and Chief Financial Officer at PACCAR

That's probably the biggest variable in that profit number. Yes.

Jeff Kauffman
Analyst at Vertical Research

Okay, that's all I have. Thank you.

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

You bet.

Operator

Your next question will come from the line of Felix Boeschen with Raymond James. Please proceed with your question.

Felix Boeschen
Analyst at Raymond James

Hey, good morning everybody.

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

Good morning.

Felix Boeschen
Analyst at Raymond James

Hey Preston, I just have one. You mentioned earlier in the call, average truck age is up 10% to 15%, can you clarify that comment a little bit? Is that in North America number, a year-over-year number? And I'm really curious just big picture versus different cycles, say, going back a couple of years, maybe industrial recession levels, how has the average age of the North American fleet changed over time versus where it is today?

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

Yes, I would think of it, if you're saying macroscopic, I would think of it in terms of each year is its own circumstance and that the model can be disrupted by any number of factors, but I don't think that the general expectations of fleet is changing much. They want to maintain a fleet age is a certain level, and when they get beyond that, then they want to replace it. Obviously, there's slight nuances to cycle timing but their freight volume is strong and the easiest way -- as we think about it, as their freight volume is strong and they look at the opportunity of owning the great new Kenworth, Peterbilt and DAF trucks, and the fact that those are going to yield thousands of dollars per unit in savings, we see no reason that won't continue. Nuances beyond that, seem less significant.

Harrie C.A.M. Schippers
President and Chief Financial Officer at PACCAR

And I would say that's more or less around the globe. Every market of us had COVID related shutdowns and under production in 2020. Every market had chip shortages in 2021. So we under produced customer demand for almost two years or a big chunk of those two years. And that means there's a lot of a pent-up demand that we're trying to recover now, but it's probably going to -- it's going to take longer than just this year before we get there.

Felix Boeschen
Analyst at Raymond James

Right. Helpful. I appreciate it.

Operator

Your next question will come from the line of Courtney Yakavonis with Morgan Stanley. Please proceed with your question.

Courtney Yakavonis
Analyst at Morgan Stanley

Hi, good morning, guys. So I guess I just wanted to first just get a check on the quarter. Obviously,you guys came in smack in the middle of your delivery guidance but I think Europe was a little higher than we were expecting, and the US was, North America was a little bit lower. So just wanted to get how it came in versus your expectations on a geographic level? I think you mentioned that you're expecting shipments to increase for all geographies heading into next quarter. And then, just more broadly on the industry outlook. It sounds like supply chain issues are getting a little bit better, so very positive about end market demand. So you raised the low end of your guidance for the industry, but just curious why there was no adjustment to the top end?

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

Sure. As we looked at the segment deliveries, geographic deliveries, I'd say in North America, we just saw that we had, in the medium-duty market actually, some impact to the supply base there, which kind of constrained North American medium-duty deliveries, and that was probably what weighed in the first quarter. And hopefully, we'll see some reconciliation there in the second quarter of that. And I'd say from an industry standpoint, our guidance is just we tightened [Phonetic] it up a little bit, and we've tightened it up to move the midpoint up because the market still feels really strong to us. So in that up -- in that view is where we saw ourselves sitting.

Courtney Yakavonis
Analyst at Morgan Stanley

Okay, great. And then, you made some comments earlier just about the positive mix improvement as new trucks become a higher percentage of the build, and I think you gave us some color on how that mix should improve through the year. But can you just help us understand what the margin differential is between that new product line in North America and Europe versus last year's? And how big of a gap, is it mostly just in pricing or is the cost structure significantly better?

Harrie C.A.M. Schippers
President and Chief Financial Officer at PACCAR

Yes, the margin opportunity for the new models is of course excellent. The 7% fuel economy improvement we saw for the Kenworth and Peterbilt trucks that just puts them best in class in the industry in terms of fuel efficiency with a new DAF, with a 10% fuel economy improvement that's class-leading in Europe, and being able to create so much value for our customers, that's of course also going to be a good thing for PACCAR.

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

And the only add to it [Technical Issue] I'd give it is that these trucks are not just good for their pocket books but their drivers, which is such a key element of their business right now. There is no truck they'd rather be in than the new DAF, the new Peterbilt, the new Kenworth that. I was at a truck stop a week ago, and at the fuel isle I was talking somebody who had a new PACCAR product and they were just beside themselves with the way this truck looks and drives down the road. So I think it's important to realize that the drivers have a big play here and PACCAR products are where people want to be.

Courtney Yakavonis
Analyst at Morgan Stanley

I guess my question was more in relation to your cost structure as opposed to customer --

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

Sure. Understood. And when we make investments and big capital investments, we do it to be more efficient and we try -- we strive for that. So yes, there's some of that in there as well.

Courtney Yakavonis
Analyst at Morgan Stanley

Okay, thanks.

Operator

Your next question will come from the line of Matt Elkott with Cowen. Please proceed with your question.

Matt Elkott
Analyst at Cowen

Thank you. Good morning. Could you guys update us on your view on a possible 2023 pre-buy and how material it could be? And if you couple that with your view that orders could accelerate, again, are we looking at another solid delivery growth year in North America in 2023?

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

Well, I would say, let me take the back half of your question. So, yes, we think 2023 could be a good year. It's pretty far out, but we think it could be a really good year. As far as comments on pre-buy, we think that conversation is overdone. I think that there's a lot of great new products in the market out there. There is not a substantial change going into the general US market in terms of technologies. There'll be some improvements in CO2 reductions or fuel economy. Again, which can cause some people to want to buy earlier, some people don't to want to wait for those improvements. So I think that it's really mostly a California impact in terms of what might happen, in terms of real tech change. So I wouldn't overweight that in my thoughts of 2023.

Matt Elkott
Analyst at Cowen

Okay, that's helpful. And Preston, can you maybe provide some more insight on how manufacturing lead times for Class 8 trucks have changed over the last few quarters and where they are for orders placed today? And could longer lead times be contributing to the moderation in orders?

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

Well, what I would think of it as is we have a strong order backlog which is substantially full. So if you place an order for a truck today, you might be able to get it in the fourth quarter. But it's starting to slide out and that's why the orders have been limited is because we're not ready to open up fully the 2023 order board because of the uncertainties of what the parts supply is going to be and the cost structure is going to be. And so that's how we look at it.

Matt Elkott
Analyst at Cowen

Got it. So, all moderation could be related to 2023? Books not being open yet and not necessarily a function of underlying demand for trucks?

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

You're absolutely right, that in fact is what's happening.

Matt Elkott
Analyst at Cowen

Thank you very much.

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

You bet.

Operator

Your final question in queue is a follow-up from David Raso with Evercore ISI. Please proceed with your question.

David Raso
Analyst at Evercore ISI

Hi, thank you. Just wanted some clarification on the sequential build in Europe, I mean, even if they're just flat, that's up 37% year-over-year. And I'm just trying to understand, it's not necessarily a terribly easy comp that's driving it, is this that much share gain from the new truck? Is it an understanding the dealers want a little pipeline fill if available? I'm just trying to understand the magnitude of the growth in Europe we just saw and the implied for 2Q? Thank you.

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

Harrie?

Harrie C.A.M. Schippers
President and Chief Financial Officer at PACCAR

Well, the demand for the new truck has been excellent. And I would say that also in Europe, DAF is doing an excellent job building as many trucks as we can. So build rates continue to go up. And even with the lower number of working days in the second quarter, we expect that second quarter production would be the same or slightly up.

Matt Elkott
Analyst at Cowen

From 1Q? Okay.

Harrie C.A.M. Schippers
President and Chief Financial Officer at PACCAR

From Q1.

Matt Elkott
Analyst at Cowen

From Q1, exactly. And in year-over-year, that's up 37 plus percent, year-over-year. So I just wanted to clarify that. And lastly, June 1, the upcoming meeting, anything you want to provide for us in this platform to -- from all over as we think about the main takeaways we should be getting out of that meeting?

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

Well, we look forward to seeing you in person, that's going to be fun. And I think it's going to be a little bit more information about how the business is doing, what the future looks like for us, and the strength of PACCAR going forward and how that's going to just accelerate. So we look forward to seeing everybody there.

Matt Elkott
Analyst at Cowen

All right, I'll be there. Thank you. Appreciate.

R. Preston Feight
Chief Executive Officer at PACCAR

All right. Look forward to seeing you there.

Operator

There are no other questions in queue at this time, are there any additional remarks from the company?

Ken Hastings
Director of Investor Relations at PACCAR

We'd like to thank everyone for joining the call and thank you, operator.

Operator

[Operator Closing Remarks]

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