S&P 500   3,901.36 (+0.01%)
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AAPL   137.59 (+0.17%)
MSFT   252.56 (-0.23%)
FB   193.54 (+1.18%)
GOOGL   2,178.16 (-1.34%)
AMZN   2,151.82 (+0.25%)
TSLA   663.90 (-6.42%)
NVDA   166.94 (-2.51%)
BABA   86.79 (-1.03%)
NIO   16.44 (-1.32%)
AMD   93.50 (-3.28%)
CGC   5.52 (-5.96%)
MU   68.90 (-0.72%)
T   20.40 (+0.94%)
GE   75.25 (-0.65%)
F   12.50 (-2.72%)
DIS   102.42 (-0.70%)
AMC   12.03 (-8.03%)
PFE   52.47 (+3.59%)
PYPL   80.54 (-0.91%)
NFLX   186.35 (+1.56%)
S&P 500   3,901.36 (+0.01%)
DOW   31,261.90 (+0.03%)
QQQ   288.68 (-0.31%)
AAPL   137.59 (+0.17%)
MSFT   252.56 (-0.23%)
FB   193.54 (+1.18%)
GOOGL   2,178.16 (-1.34%)
AMZN   2,151.82 (+0.25%)
TSLA   663.90 (-6.42%)
NVDA   166.94 (-2.51%)
BABA   86.79 (-1.03%)
NIO   16.44 (-1.32%)
AMD   93.50 (-3.28%)
CGC   5.52 (-5.96%)
MU   68.90 (-0.72%)
T   20.40 (+0.94%)
GE   75.25 (-0.65%)
F   12.50 (-2.72%)
DIS   102.42 (-0.70%)
AMC   12.03 (-8.03%)
PFE   52.47 (+3.59%)
PYPL   80.54 (-0.91%)
NFLX   186.35 (+1.56%)
S&P 500   3,901.36 (+0.01%)
DOW   31,261.90 (+0.03%)
QQQ   288.68 (-0.31%)
AAPL   137.59 (+0.17%)
MSFT   252.56 (-0.23%)
FB   193.54 (+1.18%)
GOOGL   2,178.16 (-1.34%)
AMZN   2,151.82 (+0.25%)
TSLA   663.90 (-6.42%)
NVDA   166.94 (-2.51%)
BABA   86.79 (-1.03%)
NIO   16.44 (-1.32%)
AMD   93.50 (-3.28%)
CGC   5.52 (-5.96%)
MU   68.90 (-0.72%)
T   20.40 (+0.94%)
GE   75.25 (-0.65%)
F   12.50 (-2.72%)
DIS   102.42 (-0.70%)
AMC   12.03 (-8.03%)
PFE   52.47 (+3.59%)
PYPL   80.54 (-0.91%)
NFLX   186.35 (+1.56%)
S&P 500   3,901.36 (+0.01%)
DOW   31,261.90 (+0.03%)
QQQ   288.68 (-0.31%)
AAPL   137.59 (+0.17%)
MSFT   252.56 (-0.23%)
FB   193.54 (+1.18%)
GOOGL   2,178.16 (-1.34%)
AMZN   2,151.82 (+0.25%)
TSLA   663.90 (-6.42%)
NVDA   166.94 (-2.51%)
BABA   86.79 (-1.03%)
NIO   16.44 (-1.32%)
AMD   93.50 (-3.28%)
CGC   5.52 (-5.96%)
MU   68.90 (-0.72%)
T   20.40 (+0.94%)
GE   75.25 (-0.65%)
F   12.50 (-2.72%)
DIS   102.42 (-0.70%)
AMC   12.03 (-8.03%)
PFE   52.47 (+3.59%)
PYPL   80.54 (-0.91%)
NFLX   186.35 (+1.56%)

Microsoft buys game maker Activision Blizzard for about $70B

Tuesday, January 18, 2022 | Matt O'brien, AP Technology Writer


The Activision Blizzard Booth is shown on June 13, 2013 the during the Electronic Entertainment Expo in Los Angeles. Microsoft is buying Activision Blizzard, Tuesday, Jan. 18, 2022, for $68.7 billion to gain access to blockbuster games including Call of Duty and Candy Crush. The all-cash deal will let Microsoft accelerate mobile gaming and provide it building blocks for the metaverse, or a virtual environment. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)

Microsoft is paying the enormous sum of nearly $70 billion for Activision Blizzard, the maker of Candy Crush and Call of Duty, a deal that would immediately make it a larger video-game company than Nintendo while raising questions about the deal’s possible anti-competitive effects.

The all-cash $68.7 billion deal will turn Microsoft, maker of the Xbox gaming system, into one of the world's largest video game companies. It will also help it compete with tech rivals such as Meta, formerly Facebook, in creating immersive virtual worlds for both work and play.

If the deal survives scrutiny from U.S. and European regulators in the coming months, it could be one of the biggest tech acquisitions in history. Dell bought data-storage company EMC in 2016 for around $60 billion.

Activision has been buffeted for months by allegations of misconduct and unequal pay. Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella addressed the issue Tuesday in a conference call with investors.

“The culture of our organization is my No. 1 priority,” Nadella said, adding that ”it’s critical for Activision Blizzard to drive forward" on its commitments to improve its workplace culture.

Activision disclosed last year it was being investigated by the Securities and Exchange Commission over complaints of workplace discrimination and in September settled claims brought by U.S. workforce discrimination regulators. California's civil rights agency sued the Santa Monica-based company in July, citing a “frat boy” culture that had become a “breeding ground for harassment and discrimination against women.”

Wall Street saw the acquisition as a big win for Activision Blizzard Inc. and its shares soared 25% in trading Tuesday, making up for losses over the past six months since California's discrimination lawsuit was filed. Shares of Microsoft slipped about 2%.

Last year, Microsoft spent $7.5 billion to acquire ZeniMax Media, the parent company of video game publisher Bethesda Softworks, which is behind popular video games The Elder Scrolls, Doom and Fallout. Microsoft's properties also include the hit game Minecraft after it bought Swedish game studio Mojang for $2.5 billion in 2014.


The Redmond, Washington, tech giant said the latest acquisitions will help beef up its Xbox Game Pass game subscription service while also accelerating its ambitions for the metaverse, a collection of virtual worlds envisioned as a next generation of the internet. While Xbox already has its own game-making studio, the prospect of Microsoft controlling so much game content raised questions about whether the company could restrict Activision games from competing consoles, although Nadella promised the deal would help people play games “wherever, whenever and however they want.”

The acquisition would push Microsoft past Nintendo as the third-largest video game company by global revenue, behind Playstation-maker Sony and Chinese tech giant Tencent, according to Wedbush Securities analyst Daniel Ives.

“Microsoft needed to do an aggressive deal given their streaming ambitions and metaverse strategy,” Ives said. ”They’re the only game in town that can do a deal of this size with the other tech stalwarts under massive tech scrutiny."

Meta, Google, Amazon and Apple have all attracted increasing attention from antitrust regulators in the U.S. and Europe, but the Activision deal is so big that it will also likely put Microsoft into the regulatory spotlight, Ives said. Microsoft is already facing delays in its planned $16 billion acquisition of Massachusetts speech recognition company Nuance because of an investigation by British antitrust regulators.

Microsoft is able to make such a big all-cash purchase of Activision because of its success as a cloud computing provider. But after years of focusing on shoring up its business clients and products such as the Office suite of email and other work tools, Ives said Microsoft's failed 2020 attempt to acquire social media platform TikTok may have “really whet the appetite for Nadella to do a big consumer acquisition.”

Pushback against the deal was immediate from consumer advocacy groups.

“No way should the Federal Trade Commission and the U.S. Department of Justice permit this merger to proceed,” said a statement from Alex Harman, competition policy advocate for Public Citizen. “If Microsoft wants to bet on the ‘metaverse,’ it should invest in new technology, not swallow up a competitor.”

White House press secretary Jen Psaki had no comment on Microsoft's announcement at her briefing Tuesday, but emphasized the Biden administration's recent moves to strengthen enforcement against illegal and anticompetitive mergers.

Started in 1979 by former Atari Inc. employees, Activision has created or acquired many of the most popular video games, from Pitfall in the 1980s to Guitar Hero and the World of Warcraft franchise. Bobby Kotick, 59, has been CEO since 1991.

Microsoft said it expects the deal to close in its 2023 fiscal year, which starts in July. It said Kotick will continue to serve as CEO. After the deal closes, the Activision business unit would then report to Phil Spencer, who has led Microsoft's Xbox division and will now serve as CEO of Microsoft Gaming.

Kotick survived a number of executive shakeups at Activision last year after a series of controversies stemming from allegations of a toxic workplace culture. A shareholder lawsuit in August said the company failed to disclose to investors that it was being investigated in California and that it had workplace culture issues that could result in legal problems.

Activision reached a deal in September with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to settle claims that followed a nearly three-year investigation. The agency said Activision failed to take effective action after employees complained about sexual harassment, discriminated against pregnant employees and retaliated against employees who spoke out, including by firing them.

Microsoft has also been investigating its own practices toward sexual harassment and gender discrimination, opening an inquiry last week sought by investors at its annual shareholders meeting in November. The company committed to publishing a report later this year on how it handles harassment claims, including past allegations involving senior leaders such as co-founder Bill Gates.

——

AP writer Darlene Superville in Washington contributed to this report.


7 Defense Stocks to Buy as Global Tensions Continue to Grow

The United States may not officially be on a war footing. But since the Russian invasion of Ukraine, the Biden administration is pledging $350 million in military aid. And we're not the only ones. Our NATO allies are also making commitments to help Ukraine in its defense. And those commitments, along with that of the United States is likely to increase if the conflict escalates.  

That means this is the time for opportunistic investors to pounce on defense stocks. These are stocks that support the military industrial complex in the United States. Even in peace time, the defense department commands a significant portion of the federal government's budget. So it's logical to presume that more money will be spent to assist in our defense as well as the defense of other countries.

This is an example of investing in the world that exists rather than the world you may want. These seven companies stand to see a sizable increase in revenue. This is likely to spill over into earnings which in turn will lead to a higher stock price over time.

Here are seven defense stocks that you should be considering right now.



View the "7 Defense Stocks to Buy as Global Tensions Continue to Grow".


Companies Mentioned in This Article

CompanyMarketRank™Current PricePrice ChangeDividend YieldP/E RatioConsensus RatingConsensus Price Target
EMC (EMC)
1.3333 of 5 stars
$29.05flat1.58%N/AN/AN/A
Activision Blizzard (ATVI)
2.9763 of 5 stars
$77.40-0.4%0.61%24.49Hold$96.33
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