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MSFT   407.18 (-0.07%)
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TSLA   202.20 (+1.24%)
NVDA   782.66 (-0.55%)
NIO   5.46 (-5.54%)
AMD   176.42 (-0.89%)
BABA   74.82 (-3.68%)
T   16.97 (+0.83%)
F   12.38 (+3.17%)
MU   89.71 (-2.33%)
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GE   155.60 (+1.05%)
DIS   110.76 (+1.22%)
AMC   4.86 (+1.04%)
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PYPL   60.40 (+0.40%)
XOM   104.58 (+0.53%)
QQQ   435.40 (-0.50%)
AAPL   180.79 (-1.01%)
MSFT   407.18 (-0.07%)
META   485.07 (-0.41%)
GOOGL   136.17 (-1.95%)
AMZN   173.33 (-0.12%)
TSLA   202.20 (+1.24%)
NVDA   782.66 (-0.55%)
NIO   5.46 (-5.54%)
AMD   176.42 (-0.89%)
BABA   74.82 (-3.68%)
T   16.97 (+0.83%)
F   12.38 (+3.17%)
MU   89.71 (-2.33%)
CGC   3.39 (-3.97%)
GE   155.60 (+1.05%)
DIS   110.76 (+1.22%)
AMC   4.86 (+1.04%)
PFE   27.16 (+1.00%)
PYPL   60.40 (+0.40%)
XOM   104.58 (+0.53%)
QQQ   435.40 (-0.50%)
AAPL   180.79 (-1.01%)
MSFT   407.18 (-0.07%)
META   485.07 (-0.41%)
GOOGL   136.17 (-1.95%)
AMZN   173.33 (-0.12%)
TSLA   202.20 (+1.24%)
NVDA   782.66 (-0.55%)
NIO   5.46 (-5.54%)
AMD   176.42 (-0.89%)
BABA   74.82 (-3.68%)
T   16.97 (+0.83%)
F   12.38 (+3.17%)
MU   89.71 (-2.33%)
CGC   3.39 (-3.97%)
GE   155.60 (+1.05%)
DIS   110.76 (+1.22%)
AMC   4.86 (+1.04%)
PFE   27.16 (+1.00%)
PYPL   60.40 (+0.40%)
XOM   104.58 (+0.53%)
QQQ   435.40 (-0.50%)
AAPL   180.79 (-1.01%)
MSFT   407.18 (-0.07%)
META   485.07 (-0.41%)
GOOGL   136.17 (-1.95%)
AMZN   173.33 (-0.12%)
TSLA   202.20 (+1.24%)
NVDA   782.66 (-0.55%)
NIO   5.46 (-5.54%)
AMD   176.42 (-0.89%)
BABA   74.82 (-3.68%)
T   16.97 (+0.83%)
F   12.38 (+3.17%)
MU   89.71 (-2.33%)
CGC   3.39 (-3.97%)
GE   155.60 (+1.05%)
DIS   110.76 (+1.22%)
AMC   4.86 (+1.04%)
PFE   27.16 (+1.00%)
PYPL   60.40 (+0.40%)
XOM   104.58 (+0.53%)

Today's Earnings Calendar

Earnings announcements are a public statement of a company's profitability for a specific period of time, such as a quarter (90 days) or a year. Equities research analysts will issue estimates of the company's earnings numbers prior to its announcement date, which is generally set weeks or months in advance. If a company releases better results than analysts predict, its share price will generally rise after the announcement. Below you will find a list of public companies announcing their earnings results today. Learn more about earnings reports.

MarketRank™ evaluates a company based on dividend strength, earnings, valuation, analysts forecasts, and more.
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Media sentiment refers to the percentage of positive news stories versus negative news stories a company has received in the past week.
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CompanyRelease TimeConsensus EstimateActual EPSRevenue EstimateActual RevenueActions
CI Financial stock logo
CIX
CI Financial
Unknown$0.73$0.81$656.72 million$715.60 million
Energy Fuels stock logo
EFR
Energy Fuels
Unknown($0.04)($0.18)$8.87 million$0.63 million
Hudbay Minerals stock logo
HBM
Hudbay Minerals
Unknown$0.15$0.27$710.46 million$819.90 million
RB Global stock logo
RBA
RB Global
Unknown$0.56$0.56$1.41 billion$1.42 billion
TransAlta stock logo
TA
TransAlta
Unknown$0.18($0.27)N/A$624.00 million
What are earnings reports? Learn more.

Key Points

  • A company's earnings are profits representing revenue minus expenses.
  • Earnings reports provide a detailed overview of a company's financial performance during a specific period, typically quarterly or annually.
  • Analyze revenue, net income, EPS and operating margins — all information in an earnings report.
  • 5 stocks we like better than ANN

If you have a favorite sports team, you may check their stats regularly — if they won or lost their latest game, where they are in the league standings and which athletes are currently injured. Similarly, investors and analysts keep tabs on their favorite companies via earnings reports. 

What are earnings reports? They are comprehensive summaries of a publicly traded company's financial performance that offer a window into its operations and provide details regarding its ability to generate returns for shareholders in the future. 

Instead of points scored, assists or rebounds, fans of a company will keep an eye on its revenue, expenses, profits and other financial ratios to try and predict if an investment will be a win or loss. And just like a team's stats may fluctuate from game to game based on who they are playing or an athlete's performance, a company's earnings can vary quarter to quarter due to market conditions, competition or internal operational efficiency. 

Keep reading to learn more about the information on earnings reports and how this data can influence stock prices, investor confidence and broader market trends.

The basics of earnings reports

The first step to understanding earnings reports is answering the question: What are earnings? 

Earnings are profits generated by a company, representing its revenue (total income generated from sales of goods or services) minus its expenses (costs associated with producing goods or services, operating the business and overhead).

So, what is an earnings report? It provides a detailed overview of a company's financial performance during a specific period, typically quarterly or annually, and includes the following information:

  • Financial snapshot: Detailed information on a company's revenue, expenses, net income and earnings per share (EPS)
  • Comparison to expectations: Whether or not the company's actual financial results met market expectations and analyst forecasts
  • Forward guidance: Commentary on future performance in their earnings reports
  • Management discussion and analysis (MD&A): Additional context from the management team regarding a company's financial results, business operations and future outlook 

What do earnings mean for investors? It is a pivotal data point to help them determine if a company is, or will be, profitable by analyzing its financial performance. 

By consistently delivering accurate and timely information, companies can bolster investor confidence, enhance market perception and maintain regulatory compliance — all crucial for sustaining access to capital and fostering long-term growth. However, earnings reports don't only serve investors and provide a company's management team with actionable data to make informed strategic decisions, allocate resources effectively, and drive operational efficiency. 

Components of earnings reports

To assess a company's financial strength, growth prospects and long-term viability in the marketplace. You need to analyze its revenue, net income, EPS, and operating margins — all information in an earnings report.

  • Revenue: Also known as sales or turnover, revenue represents the total amount of money a company generates. High revenue indicates strong demand for the company's products or services, effective sales strategies and market competitiveness. It reflects the company's ability to generate income and grow its business operations.
  • Net income: A positive net income means the company generates profits after accounting for all expenses (like operating costs, taxes and interest). In contrast, a negative net income means the company is experiencing losses. A consistently increasing net income indicates financial health and operational efficiency. Net income is also known as net profit or the bottom line.
  • Earnings per share: Calculated by dividing net income by the total number of outstanding shares, EPS indicates the profitability of a company on a per-share basis. A higher EPS generally indicates stronger profitability and future returns for its shareholders. Investors often compare a company's EPS to its historical performance, industry peers and market expectations to assess its financial health and investment potential.
  • Operating margins: Calculated by dividing operating income by revenue and expressed as a percentage, operating margins provide insights into a company's operational efficiency and profitability from its core business activities. Higher operating margins mean a company generates more profit relative to its revenue, suggesting strong management of its costs and expenses, while lower operating margins may indicate inefficiencies or challenges. Analyzing trends in operating margins over time can help you evaluate a company's financial health and competitiveness within its industry.

Understanding quarterly vs. annual reports

As earnings reports are crucial evaluation tools for investors, companies report quarterly and annually to maintain ongoing communication with their shareholders. But they don't do this purely out of the kindness of their hearts — it's a legal requirement in many jurisdictions. 

In the United States, publicly traded companies are required by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to file three quarterly and annual earnings reports via a Form 10-K. Quarterly reports are due within 45 days of the end of each fiscal quarter, and annual reports within 60 days of the end of their fiscal year. This requirement promotes transparency and accountability, as companies must disclose material information promptly to the public.

As the name suggests, quarterly earnings reports provide a snapshot of a company's financial performance over three months. These reports typically include income and cash flow statements, balance sheets and MD&A sections where executives provide insights into the company's performance, market trends and future outlooks. 

On the other hand, annual earnings reports provide a more comprehensive overview of a company's financial performance over the entire fiscal year. This big-picture analysis typically includes audited financial statements, detailed information about company operations, risks, financial conditions, executive compensation, shareholder letters, sustainability reports and corporate social responsibility initiatives. 

Annual reports offer a broader perspective on the company's long-term strategic goals, performance trends and corporate governance practices than quarterly earnings reports do, providing investors data on its fundamentals and prospects.

The impact of earnings reports on stock prices

When a company releases its earnings report, investors and analysts carefully scrutinize the results to assess whether it met, exceeded or fell short of market expectations

When a company reports higher-than-expected earnings, it often indicates strong business fundamentals, revenue growth, operational efficiency or market outperformance. However, positive earnings surprises can also lead to upward revisions in earnings forecasts, increased target prices from analysts, and buying pressure on the company's stock. When this happens, stock prices may surge as investors rush to capitalize on the company's perceived value and growth potential.

When a company reports lower-than-expected earnings, it raises concerns about underlying weaknesses, revenue declines, cost overruns or challenges in its business operations. As such, negative earning reports often lead to downward revisions in earnings forecasts, decreased target prices from analysts and selling pressure on the company's stock, which typically causes a decline in stock prices as investors adjust their expectations and reevaluate the company's investment prospects.

Factors affecting earnings reports

Many external and internal factors can significantly influence earnings reports, including:

  • Market expectations: Analysts' consensus estimates, prior guidance from company management and industry benchmarks all contribute to market expectations. Companies that meet or exceed these expectations typically experience positive reactions from investors, while those that fall short may face negative sentiment and stock price declines.
  • Economic conditions: During periods of economic expansion, companies may experience increased consumer spending, business investment and revenue growth, leading to stronger earnings. However, economic downturns can result in reduced consumer demand, higher unemployment and lower corporate profits, which may negatively impact earnings reports. Economic indicators such as GDP growth, inflation rates and interest rates can provide context when interpreting a company's financial performance.
  • Industry trends: Industry-specific factors can influence earnings reports since companies within the same sector may face similar challenges or opportunities. Technological advancements, regulatory changes, shifts in consumer preferences and competitive dynamics can all impact a company's financial performance. For example, companies operating in the technology sector may experience growth opportunities from innovation but also face risks from rapid technological obsolescence and intense competition.
  • Operational factors: Companies that manage costs effectively, optimize production processes and maintain high levels of customer satisfaction are more likely to report strong earnings. Operational inefficiencies, production delays or quality control issues typically lead to lower profitability and adverse earnings outcomes.
  • Currency fluctuations: For companies with international operations, exchange rate movements can affect the translation of foreign revenues and expenses into the company's reporting currency, leading to currency-related gains or losses that impact earnings. Economic and geopolitical factors, such as trade tensions or central bank policies, can drive currency volatility and influence earnings outcomes.
  • External events: Unforeseen events, such as natural disasters, geopolitical conflicts, pandemics or regulatory changes, can disrupt business operations and impact earnings reports. They may result in supply chain disruptions, production delays, increased costs or changes in consumer behavior, which can affect a company's financial performance and earnings outlook.

Interpreting earnings reports

Systematically analyzing earnings reports can help you make more informed investment decisions and navigate the financial markets effectively. To interpret earnings reports effectively, follow our guide below.

  1. Assess the company's revenue, expenses, profits, assets, liabilities and cash flows by analyzing the income, balance and cash flow statements.
  2. Compare revenue growth, EPS, operating margins and return on equity (ROE) with historical performance to assess the company's performance relative to its peers and industry benchmarks.
  3. Evaluate the company's guidance and assess whether it aligns with market expectations and analyst forecasts.
  4. Compare the company's actual performance with market and analyst expectations to gauge whether the company met, exceeded or fell short of market expectations.
  5. Consider qualitative factors such as management commentary (often on a company's strategic initiatives, operational challenges and growth prospects), industry trends, competitive dynamics and macroeconomic conditions.
  6. Monitor market reaction to the earnings report (such as changes in stock price, trading volume and analyst commentary), which can provide valuable signals about investor perceptions of the company's performance and prospects.

Earnings reports and market volatility

Investors closely monitor earnings announcements, and any deviation from market expectations can lead to swift and substantial movements in stock prices. As earnings reports provide essential insights into a company's financial performance and outlook, they often serve as catalysts for market volatility as investors adjust their positions based on the new information provided.

Here are a few examples illustrating significant market reactions to earnings announcements.

Apple Inc.

In April 2020, Apple Inc. (NASDAQ: AAPL) announced it had exceeded analyst expectations despite the COVID-19 pandemic's impact on global markets. The positive earnings surprise and strong performance of its products and services reassured investors, causing Apple's stock price to surge by over 7% in after-hours trading.

Netflix Inc.

In July 2018, Netflix Inc. (NASDAQ: NFLX) reported missing subscriber growth targets and revenue expectations. Its stock price plummeted by over 14% in after-hours trading amid investor concerns about slower-than-expected subscriber growth and increased competition in the streaming market.

Tesla Inc.

In October 2021, Tesla Inc. (NASDAQ: TSLA) announced record profits and revenue, exceeding analyst expectations, which caused its stock price to surge by over 12% in after-hours trading. The strong earnings results, driven by robust vehicle deliveries and increasing demand for electric vehicles, led to renewed investor optimism in Tesla's growth prospects.

The role of earnings reports in investment decisions

​​Investors use earnings date calendars to plan their strategies, monitor key events and stay informed about earnings releases that may impact their portfolios. By paying attention to upcoming earnings reports, investors can anticipate market movements, assess company performance relative to expectations and make informed trading decisions based on the latest financial information.

Earnings reports give investors critical information on developments and trends that may impact their short-term portfolios (via quarterly reports) and long-term portfolios (via annual reports). In addition, analyzing historical earnings data and trends helps investors identify opportunities and risks associated with market timing strategies so they can optimize portfolio allocations while managing risk effectively.

When a company reports higher-than-expected earnings, it typically triggers bullish reactions from investors who interpret it as an indicator of strong business fundamentals, revenue growth, operational efficiency or market outperformance. As you would expect, positive earnings reports typically lead to increased investor confidence and optimism about the company. 

On the flip side, when a company reports lower-than-expected earnings, the market typically turns bearish as investors interpret the negative earnings surprise as a sign of underlying weaknesses, revenue declines, cost overruns or challenges in the company's business operations. It makes sense that negative earnings reports often result in decreased investor confidence and disappointment.

Challenges and limitations of earnings reports

While earnings reports are important tools, you shouldn't rely solely on them for investment decisions. Here's why:

  • Companies may employ various techniques to manipulate earnings, such as revenue recognition timing, expense deferral or asset impairment to create a distorted financial picture.
  • Depending only on a snapshot of a company's performance can sometimes lead to investors overlooking the broader, long-term prospects and fundamental shifts within industries. 
  • Earnings reports, especially those produced quarterly, often prioritize financial metrics. They can result in a lack of information on non-financial factors like corporate governance practices, management quality, product innovation, market share and competitive positioning, which can significantly impact a company's long-term success.
  • Companies may sacrifice long-term investments in research and development, infrastructure or talent development to meet short-term earnings targets, undermining future growth potential and long-term value. 
  • Market reactions to earnings reports can lead to herd mentality and speculative trading rather than informed investment decisions. If a company falls short of market expectations, even if it reports strong earnings results, its stock price may decline. Companies that beat earnings expectations may experience a temporary price increase, even if the underlying fundamentals do not support it. 
  • Earnings reports provide limited context about a company's performance relative to its industry peers, market conditions or broader economic trends. 

Study the stats, but consider the pitfalls

Earnings reports are crucial in investment decision-making, providing essential insights into a company's financial performance, growth prospects and overall health. However, investors must be aware of the potential pitfalls of relying solely on earnings reports, such as accounting practices and excluding non-financial metrics. 

Investors must stay informed and understand how to interpret earnings reports to make informed investment decisions. It's essential to look beyond the numbers, consider qualitative factors and assess the broader context for earnings results. By conducting a thorough analysis, investors can better navigate earnings reports and position themselves for long-term success.

FAQs

What are earning reports, and why are they important? Let's look at some common questions and answers about earnings reports to learn how they can impact your investments.

What happens to stocks after earnings reports?

Stocks can experience significant price movements after earnings reports, with outcomes varying based on whether the reported earnings exceed, meet or fall short of market expectations. Positive earnings surprises often lead to price increases as investors react favorably to strong performance, while negative surprises can result in price declines as confidence wanes. Additionally, market sentiment, forward guidance and broader economic factors can influence post-earnings stock movements.

What is the financial earnings report?

A financial earnings report is a comprehensive document issued by publicly traded companies quarterly or annually. 

It provides detailed information about the company's financial performance during the reporting period, such as revenue, expenses, profits and various financial ratios. 

Additionally, earnings reports often include management discussions and analysis sections, which offer insights into the company's operations, strategic initiatives and outlook for the future. These reports are crucial for investors and analysts to assess the company's financial health, make informed investment decisions and understand its prospects for growth and profitability.

What are earnings in the stock market?

A key measure of its financial performance and profitability, earnings in stock market are the profits generated by a company over a specific period, typically reported quarterly or annually. What are stock earnings? The company's revenue minus expenses. 

How do I get an earnings report?

You can access an earnings report for a publicly traded company through various sources, including the company's investor relations website, the SEC filings database (EDGAR), financial news websites, brokerage platforms and earnings stock market calendar websites.

Jessica Mitacek

About Jessica Mitacek

  • jessicamitacek@gmail.com

Contributing Author

Market Analysis and Research

Experience

Jessica Mitacek has been a contributing writer for MarketBeat since 2023.

Areas of Expertise

Market analysis and research, technology, retail

Education

Bachelor of Arts in English & Spanish, University of Vermont

Past Experience

Hedge Funds, Private Equity Funds, long/short equities, distressed debt, investor relations

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