QQQ   323.59 (+3.01%)
AAPL   127.79 (+5.39%)
MSFT   236.94 (+1.96%)
FB   264.91 (+2.83%)
GOOGL   2,069.66 (+2.36%)
TSLA   718.43 (+6.36%)
AMZN   3,146.14 (+1.72%)
NVDA   553.67 (+0.93%)
BABA   241.69 (+1.65%)
CGC   34.73 (+6.05%)
GE   13.11 (+4.55%)
MU   94.76 (+3.53%)
NIO   49.76 (+8.69%)
AMD   86.39 (+2.22%)
T   28.09 (+0.72%)
F   11.98 (+2.39%)
ACB   11.04 (+4.94%)
DIS   194.98 (+3.14%)
BA   224.39 (+5.84%)
NFLX   550.64 (+2.19%)
BAC   35.79 (+3.11%)
QQQ   323.59 (+3.01%)
AAPL   127.79 (+5.39%)
MSFT   236.94 (+1.96%)
FB   264.91 (+2.83%)
GOOGL   2,069.66 (+2.36%)
TSLA   718.43 (+6.36%)
AMZN   3,146.14 (+1.72%)
NVDA   553.67 (+0.93%)
BABA   241.69 (+1.65%)
CGC   34.73 (+6.05%)
GE   13.11 (+4.55%)
MU   94.76 (+3.53%)
NIO   49.76 (+8.69%)
AMD   86.39 (+2.22%)
T   28.09 (+0.72%)
F   11.98 (+2.39%)
ACB   11.04 (+4.94%)
DIS   194.98 (+3.14%)
BA   224.39 (+5.84%)
NFLX   550.64 (+2.19%)
BAC   35.79 (+3.11%)
QQQ   323.59 (+3.01%)
AAPL   127.79 (+5.39%)
MSFT   236.94 (+1.96%)
FB   264.91 (+2.83%)
GOOGL   2,069.66 (+2.36%)
TSLA   718.43 (+6.36%)
AMZN   3,146.14 (+1.72%)
NVDA   553.67 (+0.93%)
BABA   241.69 (+1.65%)
CGC   34.73 (+6.05%)
GE   13.11 (+4.55%)
MU   94.76 (+3.53%)
NIO   49.76 (+8.69%)
AMD   86.39 (+2.22%)
T   28.09 (+0.72%)
F   11.98 (+2.39%)
ACB   11.04 (+4.94%)
DIS   194.98 (+3.14%)
BA   224.39 (+5.84%)
NFLX   550.64 (+2.19%)
BAC   35.79 (+3.11%)
QQQ   323.59 (+3.01%)
AAPL   127.79 (+5.39%)
MSFT   236.94 (+1.96%)
FB   264.91 (+2.83%)
GOOGL   2,069.66 (+2.36%)
TSLA   718.43 (+6.36%)
AMZN   3,146.14 (+1.72%)
NVDA   553.67 (+0.93%)
BABA   241.69 (+1.65%)
CGC   34.73 (+6.05%)
GE   13.11 (+4.55%)
MU   94.76 (+3.53%)
NIO   49.76 (+8.69%)
AMD   86.39 (+2.22%)
T   28.09 (+0.72%)
F   11.98 (+2.39%)
ACB   11.04 (+4.94%)
DIS   194.98 (+3.14%)
BA   224.39 (+5.84%)
NFLX   550.64 (+2.19%)
BAC   35.79 (+3.11%)
Log in

Appeals court orders new Dakota Access environmental review

Tuesday, January 26, 2021 | The Associated Press


In this May 9, 2015, file photo, workers unload pipes in Worthing, S.D., for the Dakota Access oil pipeline that stretches from the Bakken oil fields in North Dakota to Illinois. A federal appeals court on Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2021, upheld the ruling of a district judge who ordered a full environmental impact review of the Dakota Access pipeline in North Dakota. Following a complaint by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, U.S. District Judge James Boasberg said in April 2020 that a more extensive review was necessary than the one already conducted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik, File)

FARGO, N.D. (AP) — A federal appeals court on Tuesday upheld the ruling of a district judge who ordered a full environmental impact review of the Dakota Access pipeline.

Following a complaint by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, U.S. District Judge James Boasberg said in April 2020 that a more extensive review was necessary than the one already conducted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

The $3.8 billion, 1,172-mile (1,886 kilometer) pipeline crosses beneath the Missouri River, just north of the the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation that straddles the North Dakota-South Dakota border. The tribe, which draws its water from the river, says it fears pollution.

Tuesday's ruling by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit does not require the pipeline to stop operating or be emptied of oil.

The Dakota Access pipeline was the subject of months of sometimes violent protests in 2016 and 2017 during its construction. The tribe continued its legal challenges against the pipeline even after it began carrying oil from North Dakota across South Dakota and Iowa to a shipping point in Illinois in June 2017.


7 Semiconductor Stocks Set to Gain From the Chip Shortage

Who knew that something so tiny could create such a big problem? However, that’s the case with the semiconductor industry. Chip manufacturers are facing supply chain disruptions due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Semiconductors are in high demand for the big tech companies who need the chips to power the servers for their data centers. But they are also needed for much of the technology we take for granted including laptops, tablets, mobile phones, gaming consoles, and automobiles – a sector that seems to be at the root of the current crisis.

Any weekend mechanic knows that even traditional internal combustion cars are heavily reliant on electronics. In fact, electronic parts and components account for 40% of a new, internal combustion vehicle. That’s more than doubled since 2000.

However as it turns out, some manufacturers may have overestimated how soon consumers would be ready for an “all-electric” future. And that meant that they didn’t forecast how much demand there would be for the kind of chips needed to do the mundane, but vital tasks of steering, braking, and even powering windows up and down.

Part of the problem is that U.S. businesses are heavily reliant on countries like China and Taiwan for their semiconductors. In fact, only about 12.5% of semiconductor manufacturing is done in the United States.

Of course, this creates a tremendous opportunity for the companies that manufacture these chips. And it comes at a good time. The semiconductor sector is notoriously cyclical and was coming down from the elevated demand for the 5G buildout.

In this special presentation, we’ll give you a list of seven semiconductor companies that you can invest in to take advantage of this opportunity.

View the "7 Semiconductor Stocks Set to Gain From the Chip Shortage".

Enter your email address below to receive a concise daily summary of analysts' upgrades, downgrades and new coverage with MarketBeat.com's FREE daily email newsletter.