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T   24.10 (-0.62%)
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AMC   14.90 (-6.52%)
PFE   54.02 (+1.91%)
ACB   3.86 (-4.93%)
BA   191.83 (-1.26%)
S&P 500   4,341.82 (-0.19%)
DOW   34,212.96 (+0.13%)
QQQ   344.59 (+0.01%)
AAPL   160.95 (+0.79%)
MSFT   301.97 (+1.77%)
FB   298.15 (+1.19%)
GOOGL   2,610.50 (+1.00%)
AMZN   2,825.38 (+1.73%)
TSLA   860.50 (-8.20%)
NVDA   220.81 (-3.03%)
BABA   112.48 (-0.79%)
NIO   21.53 (-4.99%)
AMD   104.27 (-5.82%)
CGC   6.95 (-3.87%)
MU   80.07 (-2.32%)
GE   89.00 (-0.36%)
T   24.10 (-0.62%)
F   19.83 (-0.40%)
DIS   135.79 (+1.64%)
AMC   14.90 (-6.52%)
PFE   54.02 (+1.91%)
ACB   3.86 (-4.93%)
BA   191.83 (-1.26%)
S&P 500   4,341.82 (-0.19%)
DOW   34,212.96 (+0.13%)
QQQ   344.59 (+0.01%)
AAPL   160.95 (+0.79%)
MSFT   301.97 (+1.77%)
FB   298.15 (+1.19%)
GOOGL   2,610.50 (+1.00%)
AMZN   2,825.38 (+1.73%)
TSLA   860.50 (-8.20%)
NVDA   220.81 (-3.03%)
BABA   112.48 (-0.79%)
NIO   21.53 (-4.99%)
AMD   104.27 (-5.82%)
CGC   6.95 (-3.87%)
MU   80.07 (-2.32%)
GE   89.00 (-0.36%)
T   24.10 (-0.62%)
F   19.83 (-0.40%)
DIS   135.79 (+1.64%)
AMC   14.90 (-6.52%)
PFE   54.02 (+1.91%)
ACB   3.86 (-4.93%)
BA   191.83 (-1.26%)
S&P 500   4,341.82 (-0.19%)
DOW   34,212.96 (+0.13%)
QQQ   344.59 (+0.01%)
AAPL   160.95 (+0.79%)
MSFT   301.97 (+1.77%)
FB   298.15 (+1.19%)
GOOGL   2,610.50 (+1.00%)
AMZN   2,825.38 (+1.73%)
TSLA   860.50 (-8.20%)
NVDA   220.81 (-3.03%)
BABA   112.48 (-0.79%)
NIO   21.53 (-4.99%)
AMD   104.27 (-5.82%)
CGC   6.95 (-3.87%)
MU   80.07 (-2.32%)
GE   89.00 (-0.36%)
T   24.10 (-0.62%)
F   19.83 (-0.40%)
DIS   135.79 (+1.64%)
AMC   14.90 (-6.52%)
PFE   54.02 (+1.91%)
ACB   3.86 (-4.93%)
BA   191.83 (-1.26%)

Powell says COVID variant clouds inflation, economic outlook

Monday, November 29, 2021 | Christopher Rugaber, AP Economics Writer

Jerome Powell,Joe Biden
FILe - Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell speaks during an event in the South Court Auditorium on the White House complex in Washington, on Nov. 22, 2021. Powell says that the appearance of a new COVID-19 variant could slow the economy and hiring. He also says it raises uncertainty about inflation. Powell says in remarks to be delivered to the Senate Banking Committee Tuesday that he recent increase in coronavirus cases and the emergence of the omicron variant pose downside risks to employment and economic activity and increased uncertainty for inflation. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell says that the appearance of a new COVID-19 variant could slow the economy and hiring, while also raising uncertainty about inflation.

The recent increase in delta cases and the emergence of the omicron variant “pose downside risks to employment and economic activity and increased uncertainty for inflation," Powell said Monday in prepared remarks to be delivered to the Senate Banking Committee on Tuesday. The new variant could also worsen supply chain disruptions, he said.

Powell's comments come after other Fed officials in recent weeks have said the central bank should consider winding down its ultra-low interest rate policies more quickly than it currently plans. They cited concerns about inflation, which has jumped to three-decade highs.

Yet Powell's remarks suggest that the additional uncertainty raised by the omicron variant may complicate the Fed's next steps.

“Greater concerns about the virus could reduce people’s willingness to work in person, which would slow progress in the labor market and intensify supply-chain disruptions,” Powell said.

While little is known definitively about the health effects of the omicron variant. If it were to cause Americans to pull back on spending and slow the economy, that could ease inflation pressures in the coming months.

Yet if the new variant causes another wave of factory shutdowns in China, Vietnam or other Asian countries, that could worsen supply chain snarls, particularly if Americans keep buying more furniture, appliances and other goods. That, in turn, could push prices even higher in the coming months.

Powell acknowledged that inflation “imposes significant burdens, especially on those less able to meet the higher costs of essentials like food, housing, and transportation.”

He said most economists expect inflation to subside over time, as supply constraints ease, but added that, “factors pushing inflation upward will linger well into next year.” At a news conference last month, Powell said high inflation could persist into late summer.

At their last meeting November 2-3, Fed policymakers agreed to start reducing the central bank's $120 billion in monthly bond purchases by $15 billion a month. That would bring the purchases to an end in June.

Those bond buys, an emergency measure that began last year, are intended to hold down longer-term interest rates to encourage more borrowing and spending. The Fed has pegged its short-term interest rate, which influences other borrowing costs such as for mortgages and credit cards, at nearly zero since last March, when COVID-19 first erupted.

Last week, the Fed released minutes from the November meeting that showed some of the 17 Fed policymakers supported reducing the bond purchases more quickly, particularly if inflation worsens. That would give the Fed the opportunity to hike its benchmark rate as early as the first half of next year.

At that time, investors expected three rate hikes next year, but the odds of that many hikes have fallen sharply since the appearance of the new coronavirus variant.


7 Pharmaceutical Stocks to Buy For a Healthy Portfolio in 2022

One year ago, investors expected 2021 to be a huge year for pharmaceutical stocks. The bullish perspective was that as vaccines rolled out and the economy reopened, investors would shift from biotech stocks to traditional pharmaceutical stocks.

But the Delta variant has kept Covid-19 top of mind for many investors. While it’s true that some pharmaceutical stocks were part of the vaccine race, other players in the space have not performed as well as was hoped. Case in point, as of October 6, 2021, the iShares U.S. Pharmaceuticals ETF (NYSEARCA:IHE) is up only 9.7% in the last 12 months. And if you bought shares of the fund at the beginning of the year, you have no growth to show for your patience.

There are reasons beyond Covid-19 to consider when assessing the disappointing performance of pharmaceutical stocks. One is the current political climate which is making no secret of its desire to reshape the healthcare industry. And it has the pricing practices of “big pharma” firmly in its crosshairs.

However, the pharmaceutical sector is still loaded with quality stocks for investors who are willing to accept the inherent risk. And that’s the focus of this special presentation. In the next few minutes, we’ll take a look at seven pharmaceutical stocks that are ready to make strong moves forward in 2022.

View the "7 Pharmaceutical Stocks to Buy For a Healthy Portfolio in 2022".


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